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2016 election

The six-term senator was a prisoner of war for five and a half years during the Vietnam War.
All of a sudden, it was OK for America to get back into hate crimes again. Behaviour that had been previously seen as scary stories from a discarded history text book are suddenly back in the news. Here we are, a long history of "haven't we become so much better" wiped clean with story after story of bigotry, Islamophobia, and Neo-Nazi ideals rising from the ashes.
Anyone who's ever been in a heated political argument with an opinionated uncle or aunt at Thanksgiving knows the perils of a political discussion. So, how do you cover what will inevitably be a topic of discussion, without starting a bitter debate with coworkers? Read on for the do's and don'ts of talking politics at the office.
Donald Trump. The narcissist with tissue paper thin skin who cannot abide any criticism whatsoever, from anyone, ever. The addict for whom there is never enough praise and adulation, who needs it so badly he cannot stop asking for compliments or, if they're slow in coming, telling the world, himself, how great he is.
The gifts of 2016 weren't sweetly wrapped in chic silver bows beneath a popcorn-trimmed tree. Rather its gifts were hiding under piles of muck, mire, and metaphorical dirty diapers. 2016 made us work for its rewards; an ongoing dichotomy. Low meeting high. Pain meeting beauty. Injustice meeting a renewed fervour for truth.
This could actually be reality TV
We've lost those we've never heard of and those we worshipped from afar. The famous and the infamous. Those whose poetry and music and performances and stories and athletic prowess and acts of heroism and sacrifice we admired. We counted on them to help us get through the trials and tribulations of our lives.
Image of "Vladimir Putin carrying his buddy Donald Trump" by DonkeyHotey on flickr through Creative Commons It has yet to
I've got to tell you, I was positively thunderstruck when I read that Donald Trump had decided to appoint the multi-millionaire dealmaker Rex Tillerson (the CEO of Exxon Mobil) as his Secretary of State. Are you kidding me?
I'm just going to come right out and say it: I think Americans have a lot to be concerned about unless, among other things, they don't care about their freedom to choose and their basic human rights. Have you been paying attention to Donald Trump's nominees? Do you know what they believe in and stand for? I have been keeping up with his picks and their platforms. And let me tell you, unless I was an affluent, white, heterosexual, conservative Christian man, I'd be more than a little nervous.
Does anyone really believe he (Trump) gives a damn? That he's in it for anything other than his ego, the good of his brand, his businesses, investments and, lest we forget, his wallet? Does anyone really think he'll last the full four years? That he won't break precedent for the umpteenth time, get bored or fed up or both, and become the first president ever to willingly resign before his first term is up? Or do something so egregious, or illegal, he'll get impeached?
Racism, prejudice, sexism, bigotry and xenophobia - these horrendous ideologies all existed before Donald Trump became president
He is well within his legal rights to run both the country and his company. There is not a damn thing anyone can do about it. You could argue that it's corrupt, or that it's unethical, but we shouldn't hold our breath waiting for either Donald Trump or Congress to embrace the notion of ethics.
For many Canadians, the outcome of the United States election has been a shock. Trump's campaign, as inarticulate and venal as it was, tapped into important and deeply rooted realities, realities that may contain lessons for Canada too. Does Canada need to worry about the same festering malaise that has become so dramatically evident in the U.S.?
Remember Donald Trump's campaign speeches when he was the Republican presidential candidate? All those promises he made? How his supporters lapped it all up? How loudly they cheered? How madly they waved their placards and signs? How riled up they got?
Yes, social media and the web have allowed us to too-conveniently block any news or facts we disagree with, while also flooding us with enough of the opposite. But here's the thing... we've always had this ability. We've always been tricked and pulled and tweezed like this.
Growing up in Montreal, Quebec during the rise of a separatist political party in the 1970s gave me a front row seat to how families can be divided because of political differences. Every Sunday, after church, this division played out in my living room. The lessons I learned then are more relevant now than ever.
We have to act "preventatively." Become active before they pass bills and laws that will affect us adversely. Once it's done, it's done. When we stay silent, when we do nothing, we send a message to our political leaders that everything is just fine and dandy. Even if we believe otherwise. That has to change.
We can't be complacent. We can't let fear and despair stop us from working to make the world a better place for everyone, regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation, physical appearance or limitations, country of origin, political leanings, education or social circumstance. And let's face it, the planet isn't in trouble, humanity is.
This is what happens when you stubbornly vote for a third party candidate -- but your country has a two-party system. This is what happens when you spitefully write in your preferred candidate's name on the ballot (even though he lost the primary). This is what happens. You don't win. You lose. And you lose big.