HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

9/11

I was a "CBCD." A Canadian-born confused Desi who wasn't born here, but may as well have been since I came to Canada so young.
Gina Haspel was involved in the CIA's torture apparatus and has repeatedly backed away from calling techniques like waterboarding immoral.
Please don't call 911 about your nail polish colour.
It used to be that the United States had a national purpose and a sense of community. For years, America had a commitment to common social goals as evidenced by Roosevelt's New Deal, Kennedy's New Frontier and Johnson's Great Society. That now seems a distant memory. After the Reagan-Bush years came Bill Clinton and another decade of selfishness and corporate greed. Although the books were eventually balanced, it was at the expense of the neediest as the gap between the haves and the have-nots widened into a chasm.
I grew up listening to Bowie's music and found myself in the days following his death turning back to those old, familiar songs. I think that many others had the same idea. It seemed that everywhere I went, I would hear Bowie's music. I think we all needed to hear his voice again.
I'll tell you how it feels to hear Trump -- a front-running candidate to lead the world's most powerful country -- say he wants a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States." How it feels to hear supporters say "send them all back."
The reality is that in Toronto, as in most police services across the continent, the vast majority of serving police officers are exceptional public servants. The bad news is that reality is entirely irrelevant. People don't form judgments or base their decisions and actions on reality. They base them on their perceptions. And a fast-growing segment of society in Toronto, in Chicago, in New York City, in Ferguson, in cities and towns across North America, perceive their police services to be acting for their own benefit -- not society's.
When we think of terrorism, we don't think of how it throws us off our axis; how it makes us question everything we think we know about safety and the well being of human kind. We think about the immediate pain caused. We are emotional; we are in tears, we are enraged with the injustice of innocent lives lost. We struggle to understand why. We struggle to get others to engage, but our only goals should be compassion and empathy.
“This was inexcusable. I am truly, truly sorry.”