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aboriginal issues

The bestselling author and NDP MLA rose to make a powerful statement.
This group thinks Aboriginal Peoples are getting a free ride with status cards and tax exemptions (limited, and specific) and they want in on it. Do these people not realize that Aboriginal Peoples do pay taxes? If not, it is unlikely they have thought further about the history of cards and tax exemptions.
The results show that Canadians still have a long way to go, said Perry Bellegarde of the Assembly of First Nations.
"Come on people do something make noises and share."
Almost half of Canadian children in foster care are aboriginal, even though indigenous people make up less than five per cent of the population, according to the most recent statistics in the 2011 Census. What's particularly gut-wrenching is the majority of aboriginal children are placed in care, not because of parental abuse, but because their families are poor. Now it's time to invest in progressive initiatives, like the Circle of Care, that keep families together.
The current system has tremendous shortcomings -- it abandons victims, leaving them to heal alone, at times powerless, and without any meaningful answers. There is a better way to help victims heal and to hold offenders accountable for their acts while empowering them to improve their lives. That alternative is restorative justice.
Mr. Harper gave an eloquent apology for the truly disastrous and racist policy of forcing First Nations children into residential schools, but the government never followed those words with the actions that would show any seriousness of purpose. For all the rhetoric about nation building, the unresolved relationship between indigenous people and other Canadians and their governments stands out emphatically as nothing less than our national shame.
The recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission were on the agenda of Canada's premiers, meeting at Happy Valley-Goose Bay earlier this week. The Premiers did more than discuss the wide-ranging recommendations.
Children or adolescents from low-income families, whose parents had lower levels of education, were at higher risk of having less well-developed brains than the individuals from middle- or high-income families with better-educated parents. Interestingly, there was little difference between the brains of high- versus average- income individuals.
As Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) releases its final report about the residential school system for aboriginal children we wonder, where is Canada's catharsis? With little media coverage up until the release of the final report, and even less public engagement, Canada has had no such emotionally transformative moment. Canada needs reconciliation. The last residential school only closed in 1996. All aboriginal communities still suffer from their impact
Earlier this month, Inuit leaders and others gathered in Ottawa to look back at the past 15 years and, more importantly, discuss Nunavut's future. With pressure growing to resolve many outstanding aboriginal treaty issues across Canada, it's worth looking at the Nunavut experience.
Aboriginal women and girls are at higher risk of becoming victims of human trafficking in Canada than non-aboriginals, according to Canada's National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking. This selling and abusing of people -- a modern-day form of slavery -- is one of the pieces that make up the complex puzzle of Canada's more than 1,100 missing and murdered aboriginal women. And another reason we must take action.
Today is the World Day of Social Justice. Who among us would disagree with such a concept? The term social justice has become commonplace and tends to go down pretty easy. But what if it goes down a bit too easily? Do we just hear the word, make a mental check mark, and move on? Are we more concerned with saying the right things than actually changing our actions? As citizens of a democracy, we have both the right and responsibility to make a difference in the policies and actions of our government.
For the youth of the Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation community, the nearest high school is hundreds of kilometres away by plane. If you break a bone, it's another flight for treatment. But despite the challenges they face, none of the residents of this remote fly-in northern Ontario community would abandon their homes and land.
Language is highly personal issue for this leader. He told us he didn't learn his own Cree tongue until university and that profoundly impacted his sense of identity. Knowing their own language, he argues, is essential for First Nations children because "studies have shown that when a child is fluent in their indigenous language, they're more successful in school and life."
In the end, an author was able to provide a simple and feasible solution to all of the issues facing my people; "Wai-Wah!" in his west coast Tsimshian native language roughly means "just do it" and may sound like a Nike slogan. What Helin believes has been crippling the Aboriginal Community for 150 years is dependence on government programs and services.
This is not your typical Canadian novel, full of sensitively deconstructed angst and lapidary, workshopped prose. This is an action- packed "issues" novel, a one-man crusade to awaken Canadians from their complacency about the possibility of a paralyzing native insurrection.
Power Shift 2012, the four-day conference brought together more than 1,000 youth from across Canada in Ottawa and Gatineau last weekend. Yet it went virtually uncovered by the media. In our era of unchallenged Conservative majority rule, we expect the media to inform and educate us with unadulterated truth and harsh realities.
In October 2011, Shannon Buck’s daughter disappeared. Fourteen-year-old Lauren had taken off for a weekend or two before