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abusive relationship

She came to Canada as a child bride for a man who was 11 years older.
I am a survivor of gender-based, domestic and sexualized violence.
Being abused as a child convinces them that they're "bad" and they deserve the same mistreatment in their adult relationships.
Domestic violence robs victims of their self-esteem, and pushes them to withdraw in other areas of their life.
Abuse comes in many forms, and it's important to recognize the different types. The most visible form of abuse is physical abuse, when your partner hits you. The other types of abuse: mental, emotional and verbal abuse are forms of abuse, however not as overt as physical violence.
Just less than ten years ago if someone you knew was in an unhealthy or abusive relationship, they didn't discuss it, and neither did you. Most people went by the notion of once you were married, you were married for better or for worse. Therefore most people who were in unhealthy relationships stayed in these relationships, and if the relationship did somehow end in most cases it was due to the death of one of the people in the relationship.
On TV and in the movies, we see men and women exhibiting terrible behaviours, but the characters on the receiving end most often react as though these actions were reasonable and acceptable, giving the viewing audience the wrong message about how to go about their own relationships.
I have spent most of my 20s in emotionally abusive relationships. Until a year ago, I thought I was the worst kind of damaged goods, a girl who could only love men who hurt her. I didn't want to talk about my experiences because I thought that my kind of pain was self-inflicted. If I was stupid enough to stay, I deserved it.
After living with someone who never let go of the opportunity to insult or debase me, honestly I had started finding it hard to laugh or grin for that matter. My so called "better half" questioned my existence throughout my marriage and so along the way I started questioning myself. After the separation, as the days turned to nights, I felt a change in myself.
We know there are many reasons why women stay in abusive relationships, but new research shows it largely boils down to raising
When I observe how people engage in romantic relationships, it seems that they do this in one of two ways: either from the perspective of a child or from that of an adult. People who pursue love from an adult perspective are looking for companionship, romance, a life partner. People who approach love from a child-like perspective, however, have a very different agenda