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Alberta Liberals

"Mr. Kenney thought it was hilarious that I didn't look it up," leader David Khan said.
Recently, Liberal MLA Laurie Blakeman proposed Bill 202 that would allow students to start a Gay Straight Alliance club in their schools. However, Alberta Premier Jim Prentice wants to counter the "unfair and unbalanced approach" of Bill 202. For Canada's LGBTQ youth, whose suicide statistics are startlingly high, GSAs may make a difference between life and death. Indeed, the cardinal principle of many religions is to love our neighbours as we love ourselves. If we cannot show grace for our LGBTQ neighbours and families, are we really living up to that hallowed principle of our own faiths?
Two short months ago, the Wildrose party was riding high. What could possibly go wrong? Jim Prentice, that's what.
EDMONTON — Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau says he wants cabinet ministers from Alberta – and it may not be just wishful thinking
The province's municipal affairs minister may have apologized his week for trying to ram new legislation down Alberta municipalities
Children should have a UN right and even a Canadian Charter right, to an education directed by their parents, and not by intellectual elites like Alberta Liberal Leader Raj Sherman or his cohort MLA Kent Hehr, who are on record for wanting to destroy Alberta's "funding following the student", parent-directed education system.
Sometimes when you want to know how prudent a political party will be with the taxpayer's dime, it doesn't hurt to consider how prudent they are when it comes to spending their own dime at party headquarters. Compared to their counterparts in other provinces, the B.C. Liberal party spends like there's no tomorrow. And it's spending that increasingly points to something ominous: election campaigns that never end.
There's an aura growing around Trudeau, or perhaps there has always been one, that gives liberals (I use the small "l" intentionally) hope for the future. Especially in the face of Stephen Harper's quietly draconian governing style rising up again in the form of a new omnibus bill as the fall session starts. "Can Trudeau reignite the flame of the centre-left?" Canadians wonder. Trudeau's aura brings with it a halo effect to liberal/Liberal politics that's been missing since, well, I don't know when. Yesterday, for example, I got an accidental phone call from a disaffected NDP supporter in Montreal (which is odd, since I'm based in the provincial Liberal office in Edmonton). She was upset that the NDP in Quebec were drifting toward what she termed "soft nationalism" and she didn't want to remain with a party that supported separation, no matter how softly. Toward the end of the conversation she asked whether I knew if Trudeau had officially declared his nomination. "Ah, there it is," I thought.
Alberta is the base of the Conservative Party of Canada, and the province is as blue as they come. A recent poll suggests
With Alison Redford at the helm, the Progressive Conservatives are back in their comfort zone, holding a huge lead over their