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algae

Some scientists have declared that Lake Winnipeg is a lost cause, but there is both reason and evidence for hope.
In a disturbing case of history repeating itself, we find ourselves in the same place we were 17 years ago with the Manitoba government once again assisting in the unrestricted growth of the pig industry, with devastating environmental consequences and immeasurable animal suffering sure to follow.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Imagine for a moment a fully sustainable food product with no land, animal, or lab requirements. This may seem impossible, yet it does exist in the form of seaweed. Each and every year, up to 5 billion tonnes of these algae are harvested as food yet this number only represents a small amount of what is available on Earth.
"If climate change is a shark, then water is its teeth." Like a fish that doesn't notice the shark until it feels its sharp bite, humans will first feel the effects of climate change through water. Under current projections, most freshwater ecosystems globally will face ecologically significant impacts by the middle of this century.
Instead of a single moment, a card can offer joy over several days. It's a technological advancement rooted in an unlikely source, microbes. By using certain species of algae, a card can turn into a message-delivering device to offer joy and excitement throughout the Holiday season.
Long before the health movement became popular, fish oil was recognized as a healthy part of a nutritious diet. The actual benefit didn't really become known until the 1970s when ingestion of these oils apparently led to better cardiovascular health. Within a few decades, the oil (as well as the fish itself) was suggested as a means to keep heart disease at bay. Today, we know of several chemicals contained within the oil that improve our health. Some of the best are the omega-3 fatty acids.