HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Andrew Weaver

Tory voters are most likely to feel this way, according to Angus Reid Institute numbers.
"I hope the change in language... isn't indicative of a change in the NDP's position on this project."
It was a pretty safe bet going into election night that regardless of how the vote broke that there were four words from Premier Christy Clark's 2013 victory speech which would be left unsaid this year: "Well, that was easy."
British Columbia could soon be the second Canadian province to try out a basic income.
Behind the politics, the rhetoric, the spin and the muckraking, there are people. People of passion and who desire to fight for what they believe in. If we cannot build bridges and learn to understand those with whom we most deeply disagree, we will never be able to come together and change things in this province.
Many Liberal and Green voters who rejected John Horgan's strategic voting appeals did so to prevent a B.C. credit crisis. Thanks to a near-tie in seats between the other two parties, the B.C. Greens could both meet their progressive goals and prevent a future credit crisis by forcing the NDP to pull back on spending targets.
The Gord Campbell-led Liberals had substantially more votes than our principal opponent, the B.C. New Democrats - some 40,000 votes. We owned the popular vote, right from the moment that the polls closed. We'd end up with three percentage points more than the NDPers, in fact. But we were still losing.
Why are we not questioning the cost (both financially and socially) of our current Liberal government's policies? The cost aspect of a promise or platform is a justified question, but only if you hold every party to the same scrutiny.
The B.C. Liberals head into an election under the weight of a political donation scandal.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has embarked on a cross-Canada tour, ostensibly to reconnect with Canadians -- or at least those that can't afford $1,525 to bend his ear in private. At three times his going rate, the prime minister would still be a bargain compared to Christy Clark.
"I remember the time a stranger pulled me off the sidewalk into the bushes. There was no doubt in my mind that he wanted to hurt me."
Former prime minister Stephen Harper's government issued 14 permits for work on the $9-billion Site C dam during the writ period of the last election -- a move that was offside according to people familiar with the project and the workings of the federal government.
"This is common within the Harper Tories to find people whose views are based on... I don't know where they get their views from, but they're not scientific."
Forget the dirty money "jobs and billions" dreams Premier Christy Clark and her cabinet cronies sell. Their sleight of hand is clumsy, bad for B.C., bad for our planet and the children to come.
Peter Bevan-Baker won the Green Party's first-ever seat in the Prince Edward Island legislature.
Not only would the bill do nothing to stop, or even reduce, the recreational killing of grizzlies, it would end up providing cover for grizzly killers who would like nothing more than to be able to mischaracterize their trophy hunting of bears as a food hunt.
“I conclude the defendants have been careless or indifferent to the accuracy of the facts,” said a B.C. Supreme Court justice.
"Basically for the last year or so we've watched more and more information be denied to us intervenors in the National Energy Board process."
Robert Johnson and his brother, members of the Heiltsuk First Nation, nicknamed the grizzly bear "Cheeky". The brothers were
Throughout 2013, 22 per cent of media requests for interviews with scientists were denied while requests in the past five months have increased by 50 per cent, the letter states. In total Environment Canada received just 316 media requests in 2013, of which 246 (78 per cent) were approved. Climate scientist at the University of Victoria and Green party MLA Andrew Weaver says the fact that Environment Canada is giving such a small amount of interviews is "shameful." What is more troubling, says Weaver, are the kinds of interview requests being denied.