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Andrew Weaver

Tory voters are most likely to feel this way, according to Angus Reid Institute numbers.
"I hope the change in language... isn't indicative of a change in the NDP's position on this project."
It was a pretty safe bet going into election night that regardless of how the vote broke that there were four words from Premier Christy Clark's 2013 victory speech which would be left unsaid this year: "Well, that was easy."
British Columbia could soon be the second Canadian province to try out a basic income.
Behind the politics, the rhetoric, the spin and the muckraking, there are people. People of passion and who desire to fight for what they believe in. If we cannot build bridges and learn to understand those with whom we most deeply disagree, we will never be able to come together and change things in this province.
Many Liberal and Green voters who rejected John Horgan's strategic voting appeals did so to prevent a B.C. credit crisis. Thanks to a near-tie in seats between the other two parties, the B.C. Greens could both meet their progressive goals and prevent a future credit crisis by forcing the NDP to pull back on spending targets.
The Gord Campbell-led Liberals had substantially more votes than our principal opponent, the B.C. New Democrats - some 40,000 votes. We owned the popular vote, right from the moment that the polls closed. We'd end up with three percentage points more than the NDPers, in fact. But we were still losing.
Why are we not questioning the cost (both financially and socially) of our current Liberal government's policies? The cost aspect of a promise or platform is a justified question, but only if you hold every party to the same scrutiny.
The B.C. Liberals head into an election under the weight of a political donation scandal.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has embarked on a cross-Canada tour, ostensibly to reconnect with Canadians -- or at least those that can't afford $1,525 to bend his ear in private. At three times his going rate, the prime minister would still be a bargain compared to Christy Clark.