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anglophones

It's not that a crackdown on English is without precedent, but lately the way controversies get framed in North American media is different.
By virtue of a shared language, religion, skin colour or ethnic background, should we feel compelled to publicly denounce an individual that commits a criminal offence? Is it fair to assume that the absence of such a denunciation implies a tacit endorsement of the offender?
Several students were able to register following initial rejection by returning and speaking to different revisors or to their supervisors. This eventual success, however, underscores the fact that that when insufficient linguistic precision is coupled with haphazard revisor training, registration becomes subservient to bureaucratic fickleness; that is to say, it degenerates into a crapshoot.
Like many Canadians I love to indulge in a cup of Tim Hortons coffee. They're Canadian, there are lots of them, and they're affordable. And who doesn't love their infamous Rrrrollll Up The Rim to Win contest? But I am willing to put my pride aside and in fact boycott Tim Hortons indefinitely.
I learned French in 30 days. Well not really. It's probably fairer to say I'm still trying to perfect my English. Over two years ago I embarked on a tour of Quebec to give translated presentations on our industry to what was then quite a hostile population. Unexpectedly these presentations, while emotionally draining, were surprisingly effective.
The secular fundamentalism as practiced in the province of Quebec is destructive to the bi-lingual, multi-ethnic fabric of Canada. Quebec's narrative of uni-lingualism, uni-culturalism and uni-ethnic absolutism is a throwback to tribalism that flourishes in parts of Africa and the Middle East.