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animal rights

The American fast-food chain has repeatedly opposed LGBTQ rights.
It would finally ban the breeding, display and trade of whales, dolphins and porpoises.
As one of world's leading exporters of live animals, the country is also one of the largest contributors to animal suffering.
Outdated policies continue to permit the brutal killing of one of the most intelligent, sentient and family oriented non-human animals that walk the planet.
The practice of pound seizure for research is not only glaringly out of step with public opinion, it is out of step with modern science.
We documented every room, every injury — the dismembered piglet tails all over the floor, the castration wounds, the dumpsters of dead animals.
The Canadian government is consulting Canadians on three food law or policy changes that would impact animals.
It's 2017, and where are we? Animal testing and cruelty cannot be defended on any rational, well-thought-out grounds (not that it ever could have been), but it's still routinely done even in supposedly advanced countries.
I've been documenting our use, abuse and sharing of spaces with non-human animals for nearly two decades. Since 2005, I've attended many rodeos across Canada, and what I've documented time and time again is that while rodeos might be a fun day out for us, they are no fun for all the other participants: the animals.
Although the purpose of National Seal Products Day is supposedly to celebrate the importance of the seal hunt for Canada's indigenous people and coastal communities, politicians have inexplicably chosen to focus on seal "products" rather than the people, culture and traditions that have been historically involved in seal hunting.
The opportunity to interact with wild animals can be one of the most rewarding and memorable travel experiences, however, any time humans and wild animals come together there is also potential for danger, harm and abuse. Responsible travellers need to be informed.
Ticks may be tiny, but they can pose huge problems for both you and your pet if they get a chance to bite. Don't be scared though. There's plenty of ways to help protect your pets.
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Animals are present in almost every aspect of human life: our meals, our clothing, our entertainment industries, and yet they live their lives in the dark. Sometimes their suffering is hidden behind the walls of factory farms, where billions of animals live short, painful lives every year.
Proposing a research project under the guise of science to provide cover for an ongoing illegal slaughter of wildlife in a protected area and allow individuals to profit financially from it -- and then pretending that this has anything to do with "sustainable development" -- is a joke.
At different points they could express happiness, sadness, loneliness, excitement and even anxiety. Dogs are also very intelligent creatures that know and understand what is going on around them. One of our dogs could tell we would be going on vacation whenever we brought out our suitcases and would start sulking a day in advance. It must be appreciated that dogs are smart and emotional beings.
Thanks to the hard work of humane societies and SPCAs across Canada, we have a lot to celebrate this holiday season. The Canadian Federation of Humane Societies has just released our annual Animal Shelter Statistics Report, and it is full of great news for companion animals in Canada.
The comment was made that National Seal Products Day "makes a statement, not a holiday." But statements will do little to benefit Inuit sealers who could use real and tangible assistance in accessing the markets for products from their full-use seal hunt. They also fail to provide viable alternatives for fishermen in Atlantic Canada.
Canada's humane societies and SPCAs have been telling their own individual stories since the 1800s, but we haven't had the chance to tell the collective, Canadian story until now. A new, first-of-its-kind sector report just released by the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies gives us that bigger picture view.
Vancouver has long been a vegetarian-friendly town. Back in 2010, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals named the city the sixth most veg-friendly city in North America and number one in Canada. But Vancouver and the rest of B.C.'s Lower Mainland have become more than just a good place to buy a veggie burger.