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antipsychotics

Put simply, Whitaker and the Mad in America anti-psychiatry folks are adamant that anti-psychotic medication for schizophrenia makes people sick and shortens their lives. Research fails to support these contentions but they persist and the data is ignored.
The percentage of long-term care home residents who are using antipsychotic medications varies from zero per cent in some of the province's homes to 67 per cent in others, according to a new report published by Health Quality Ontario. That's a striking amount of variation.
A government agency in Ontario has called for nursing homes in that province to re-evaluate their use of antipsychotic medications like quetiapine (marketed under the brand name Seroquel). What is missing from these studies and investigations, however, is what is happening with these drugs in hospitals. I learned about Seroquel, like so many patients and families have, the hard way.
These past six months have been an onslaught of revelations, some good and some bad, as I've been navigating my way through my diagnoses. Along with the side effects of the cocktail of medications that have been hit and miss in helping to alleviate the symptoms of my mental illnesses, adjusting to my life has been a juggling act of emotions.
A January 8 letter to the Toronto Star headlined "Preventing Another Newtown" pointed out that "The perpetrators of almost every mass shooting were on psychotropic drugs." As absurd as it may seem, there is a myth that continues to grow after mass shootings and that is that the cause of these shootings are psychiatric medications themselves. But studies demonstrate that most acts of violence are committed by people who are not being treated.