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asthma

Are asthmatics more at risk when it comes to COVID-19?
Infection can lead to a troubling battle that may lead to asthma attacks as well as the need for hospitalization.
"The general idea that air pollution levels in Canada could go kind of in the wrong direction is scary."
Asthma is generally divided into two categories: intrinsic and extrinsic asthma. Intrinsic asthma is triggered by something "inside" the body, including exercise, infection and even emotions such as laughing, crying or distress. Extrinsic asthma, also known as atopic or allergic asthma, is triggered by substances "outside" the body. These allergens are often the same substances that cause seasonal allergies, such as pollen, grass and ragweed. Here's how to handle them both.
While there isn't a cure, it can be controlled.
Enough with the damaging stereotypes.
It's that time of the year when the air warms up, the humidity rises, and those with allergies suffer. The culprits are numerous but usually involve outdoors allergens. Yet, one particularly problematic pest lives inside the home and is known to cause a variety of respiratory troubles including asthma.
Researchers have known the immune system plays a role in fighting the virus and other parts of the body do change. But a detailed account of what happens at the site of battle has been for the most part a mystery. Now an international team of researchers have given us a glimpse into the war happening inside.
I hug an acquaintance, start catching up and then I start coughing. I take a sip of my wine but the mucus in my throat seems to get thicker. Cough. Cough. Wheeze. Cough. Some people are looking at me. Oh, how embarrassing. Deciding to catch my breath privately, I leave and head down the hall looking for a ladies' room while digging for my asthma puffer. Hmm, there's a distinct wheeze. It's OK. One good inhalation of this puffer is all I ever need. Uh oh. There's a problem. I can't inhale now.
Increased sulphur dioxide (SO2) pollution from the expanded Rio Tinto Alcan (RTA) aluminum smelter in Kitimat, B.C. will result in increased health costs for local households, an expert witness told an Environmental Appeals Board panel in Victoria, Monday.