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Attawapiskat

The lyrics of "Politician Man" were inspired by Attawapiskat First Nation's water emergency.
The First Nation's water supply is becoming increasingly toxic.
We travelled 40 miles in the snow to give him a traditional Cree burial.
Filmed in a Cree community, it addresses depression and not giving up.
The Twin Islands are traditional territory of the Attawapiskat Cree, and so is the largest island in the James Bay (Akimiski Island).
It was such a wonderful feeling to see him get his first kill. Geeshig was shining so bright, and for me, as a father, it was such a proud moment. I am satisfied knowing this hunt will stay with him for the rest of his life. He will always look back on it and be thankful for his dad.
The NDP MP said these tragic deaths are preventable.
The first comprehensive study to analyze the effect of high food prices in northern Ontario communities suggests First Nations people living in remote northern Ontario communities need to spend more than half their income on food to meet basic nutritional needs.
The toxic headlines, the comment sections, the conversations with "helpful" strangers; how does a young indigenous youth process and proceed? It's hard enough just being a "native teen." When you're locked down in "Indian" designation, you have to cope with the confusion, fear, anger and anguish that you are exposed to every day.
A First Nations police force, the Nishnawbe Aski Police Service (NAPS), who serves and protects 35 northern Ontario communities is voting to strike because they do not have access to the basics that law enforcement should have and it is putting officers in high-risk "nightmarish" situations.
Now is the time. The political and legal ducks are aligned. There is a friendly government. But we need your solutions. As a government we are not going to impose solutions. With your leadership we can and will make enormous progress for all of us. There is no need to refight battles that have already been won. Limited resources, time and energy have to be expended on building - not fighting. On creating - not destroying.
Last month, I wrote about my frustration with how slowly Canada is moving toward reconciliation with First Nations, Metis and Inuit Peoples. I despaired about the bad news coming out of reservations, the streets, the jails, our women and girls, the youth suicides... and wondered if we were ever going to move from pretty words to action.
"They should leave the reserves without a decent education?"
"I don't think you could deny that our country has an issue with racism."
I contend that the decades of poverty, the murder of more than 1,000 women, the many youth suicides, and the general degradation of a race of people deserve equal attention to the aid and love being bestowed on Fort McMurray. Why is one crisis receiving massive support while another is getting little attention?
"Not only did the last school [not] close down until 1996, but the damage inflicted poisoned our stream of thought for generations to come."
Dealing with the current crisis isn't enough, because this crisis is unending. As the Attawapiskat teen who confronted Bennett pointed out, our First Nations are living in third-world conditions, and that needs to be dealt with first. We need to build livable houses with access to drinkable water. We need to hire permanent local mental health care workers and addiction specialists. We need to get adults jobs, be it developing local resources, producing and selling traditional goods or telecommuting to office jobs. As Bill Yoachim of the Snuneymuxw First Nation on Vancouver Island told CBC when asked about the suicide crisis: "We need to create space, whether through sport or culture or recreation, to make people feel alive."
If we can be moved to action watching footage of children living in poverty in third-world countries, we should be equally driven to effect change when we see the inhumane conditions that exist for our First Nations communities across the country.
Children globally have remained the most vulnerable population and even though we have learned trauma will continue to happen, and happen again in various forms when it is not acknowledged or treated, we keep exposing kids to physical, mental, emotional and sexual violence.