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auto industry

We can anticipate a reduction in cars per capita of 20 to 30 per cent in the next decade.
The Bank of Canada's interest rate hikes are taking a toll.
History shows how cities across the Great Lakes region, including Oshawa, could be affected by GM's mass auto plant closures.
Some may argue that the world is a lot more complicated today, which is why we need more complicated trade deals, but this is simply false.
My mother told me about the bad car buying experiences of women she knew that purchased vehicles priced at a higher rate than what men are offered.
Canada should side with the U.S. in NAFTA talks on the auto industry, ex-CIBC chief economist says.
With winter firmly in the rearview mirror, it's time to make sure your vehicle is ready for the summer roads ahead because
It's estimated that about 18 per cent of all greenhouse gas emissions in Canada come from the cars we drive and how we drive them. With almost one-fifth of greenhouse gas emissions coming from our cars, there's a lot we can do to drive change and minimize our impact on the environment as motorists.
While Liberals continue with their failed Bobby McFerrin "Don't worry be happy" economic mantra, the data paints a different picture. In 2009 the number of Canadians who considered themselves working class or poor was 29 per cent. That number has since jumped to a stunning 44 per cent.
Back in 2013, the province said they would lower auto insurance rates by 15 per cent. Since then rates have decreased overall, but the road to achieving a 15 per cent reduction in rates is long and the final destination is still off in the distance.
At noon this Friday, what was once thought impossible is scheduled to happen -- Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. We are entering a period of unprecedented instability brought on by a Commander in Chief in the United States who seems to make policy through middle-of-the-night tweets and headline-grabbing interviews with select media.
One of the most exciting commitments coming from the auto and technology makers during CES 2017 is the ambition to realize driverless car capability for city streets as early as 2020.
Ever toyed with the idea of picking up a new car at the factory in Europe and touring around for a few weeks? Or did you
Unifor has done more in the last three months to secure the industry's footprint in Canada and offer a brighter future for autoworkers, their families and their communities, than governments have in the last 10 years. Our union secured this without an auto pact in place.
The stability of the auto industry in Canada became much more secure this week with Unifor's new collective agreement with Fiat-Chrysler. The job we set for ourselves last summer to establish a strong footprint for the entire auto industry in this country for the next generation, is not done yet. We still have a deal to negotiate with Ford.
The notion that free trade equals exporting jobs is an easy sell with many American voters. The reality -- that jobs rely on complex supply chain relationships to keep North America competitive in the face of global competition -- is definitely not as catchy.
There is no look at intellectual property rights and what the deal means for drug prices or the potential for setting up a much-needed Pharmacare program in this country. The impact on supply management, and what that means for dairy farmers, processors and the milk we drink is only partially addressed.
I can tell you I have weighed the decision to focus the 2016 negotiations on General Motors (GM) very carefully, and only after a great deal of input from the excellent negotiators and bargaining committees that we have working with us on behalf of Unifor members employed at Fiat Chrysler, Ford and GM in Canada.
Tesla has inspired a forward-thinking lifestyle that advocates change in the way people perceive driving. Sure, there are numerous well-received all-electric cars on the market, but there's one primary difference: Tesla's mission statement is centred around the growth of electric vehicles.
These two advanced manufacturing sectors directly employ more than 200,000 Canadians in good jobs that form the backbone of Canada's middle class. Even more are employed in the spinoffs from these two sectors -- both the suppliers to auto and aerospace, and the spending habits of its well-paid workers.