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auto insurance

Fraud must be rooted out and the costs to settle claims must come down.
Back in 2013, the province said they would lower auto insurance rates by 15 per cent. Since then rates have decreased overall, but the road to achieving a 15 per cent reduction in rates is long and the final destination is still off in the distance.
Much as the manual transmission has all but disappeared in the 21st Century, the idea of driving a car in the manner of a Steve McQueen may soon also be a thing of the past. Autonomous features will almost assuredly become mandatory -- and switching them off could become a too-expensive option.
December is here and no matter where you live in Canada, the days have gotten shorter and cooler, and you may have already experienced snowfall. While you can't always predict the weather, it's pretty much guaranteed that you'll have to face at least a few storms during the winter season. And whether you're a veteran in driving under extreme weather conditions or you're still getting used to the feel of a snow-covered road, it's important to prep yourself -- and your car -- for what's ahead.
Fhe time change means there's going to be an extra challenge in the coming weeks. Darkness will fall much earlier and road conditions will start to deteriorate. Here's what you need to keep in mind before starting the car and getting on the road.
Among the most important markets within IoT is the automotive industry, where the connected car is already taking off. The IoT-enabled vehicles weave together a suite of integrated devices, which offer many benefits, like improved safety and security, a personalized user experience (Spotify playing your favourite song when you open the door), and a transformed way we think about vehicle ownership.
If you live in Brampton, Vaughan or Mississauga and feel like you're paying too much for car insurance, you're not alone
The leaves are beginning to fall, the nights are getting longer and the daytime temperatures are dropping. Yes, the autumn season is upon us. To ensure your vehicle is ready for the changing weather conditions ahead, we're uncovering the truth behind 11 popular driving myths so you can brush up on your knowledge of your car and the roads.
When it comes down to it, an electric car can actually save you thousands of dollars down the road when it comes to fuel costs. In addition, some provinces have launched incentive campaigns to help drivers subsidize the initial purchase price. In Ontario for example, drivers can save up to $13,000 on eligible vehicles thanks to incentives.
Getting your driver's licence is an exciting time in your life. It allows you the freedom of taking to the open road, either to visit friends, explore far away locales or simply get you back and forth to work in a timely manner. But, with Ontario's graduating licensing program this means these privileges come with limits.
It's the most wonderful time of the year for motorists -- or so you would think. Despite not having to deal with snow or ice on our roads, there's actually a spike of driving tickets and a rise in collisions in July, August and September.
You've probably heard that buying a car is one of the worst investments you can make. Reports suggest Canadians spend more than $5,000 a year on maintenance and gas, not to mention tickets, driver's licence and plate renewals, parking and insurance. But does it really have to be this way?
But regulatory approval is still pending.
modern winter tires offer up to 50 per cent more traction than all-seasons, and it's estimated that they'll shorten your braking distance by as much 25 per cent. It's widely reported that winter tires simply handle winter weather conditions better than all-seasons, and from personal experience, I'm a believer.
It is easy to bash banks (the NDP obsession), or telecommunications and internet service providers (the Tory preoccupation) but some competition already exists in both those sectors though more is preferable to less. In contrast, both parties miss obvious policy areas that could save consumers a small fortune -- but where prices are currently jacked up in favour of existing producers.
Former B.C. Premier W.A.C. Bennett once had a cabinet minister tell him he would treat taxpayers' money as if it were his own. "Oh, no, you won't," Bennett said, "not as long as I'm premier. That money is tax money, it's trust money, and I want 110 cents worth of value out of every dollar." That's a philosophy the overpaid executives at the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) have clearly failed to embrace. That shouldn't be a surprise -- government monopolies are notoriously inefficient and expensive.