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Bank of America

Investor confidence is plunging.
As an oil exporting country, we stand to gain. But as a country that does a lot of driving, we risk pain.
In a town perhaps previously best known for providing the dirt that allowed Boston to double in size by filling in its swampy Back Bay there is a startling banking counter-revolution underway. Led by long-established but newly-rejuvenated Needham Bank and involving not only that town but those nearby, community banking is reclaiming market share.
Not one of the executives at any of the 10 or so giant international investment banks in the U.S. and Europe that imploded the financial system five years ago by using illegal trading methods has gone to jail, or even been prosecuted. Why hasn't more been done? That's a good, and frustrating, question.
What will you risk to get ahead? We live in culture that applauds overworking. Commonly heard complaints, such as "I am killing myself at work" usually get met with a pat on the back rather than a look of concern. Although, it's rare that even extreme cases of overworking lead to death, it's not unheard of. And this mentality isn't going anywhere. Any change in corporate culture will not take place overnight, especially in environments where excessive hours are a long-held tradition.
Five years after the Great Recession of 2007-08 destroyed the lives of millions of people and cost trillions of dollars, many of the big investment banks that caused the near total meltdown are still involved in shady and sometimes criminal financial gambling schemes that could crash the world economy again.
The banking industry is getting personal in its tireless fight against regulation. Jamie Dimon, chief executive of JPMorgan
For snowbirds looking to make their annual sojourn to southern U.S. climates, this recent weakness in the canuck buck couldn't have come at a worse time. My advice for those who are going to be looking to convert Loonies for greenbacks is to stagger those purchases over the next few months.
Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway plans to buy $5 billion worth of preferred shares of Bank of America, according to CNBC
Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke’s unprecedented effort to keep the economy from plunging into depression included lending banks