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BC economy

Well we are a month away from the provincial election here in B.C. which is hard to miss considering the non stop Liberal ads running every day all day on the radio, TV and social media. I don't know about you but I am pretty sick of listening to how great the Liberals are and how B.C. is #1 in everything.
As the provincial election is fast approaching it can be hard to keep up with or remember all the deceptions of Christy Clark and the B.C. Liberals. So let's take a look at 10 of the biggest ones.
Canada's economic balance of power is forecast to shift this year from Alberta's oilsands to British Columbia's coast. The
The Woodfibre LNG issue in Squamish holds vast importance for the broader community, the province, the country, even the world at large. It's that big.
The B.C. Jobs Blueprint has a few worthy goals that, if achieved, will go a long way toward addressing both societal injustices and economic needs: a dramatic increase in young people entering the trades, training opportunities for aboriginal students, and support for education and training for people with disabilities. But where the plan falls apart is that it focuses on an industry that not only spews vast amounts of chemicals into our waterways but also speeds up global warming, the driver of climate change.
One item sorely missing from the B.C. finance minister's recent budget was a plan to make the province's business taxes more competitive and attractive for investment. When the province shifted back to the PST last year, the cost of doing business and investing increased dramatically. Disappointingly, de Jong's budget did nothing to address this shackle around BC's economy. Tax reform, however, might be the light at the end of tunnel.
Tuesday's provincial budget is supposed to present a plan to finally balance the books. But after four consecutive years in the red, British Columbians can't yet breathe a collective sigh of relief. Critically important is how Finance Minister Mike de Jong plans to eliminate the deficit. Will he take the path of tax increases or spending reductions? He would be wise to go with the latter. And this is why...
British Columbians are an optimistic bunch when it comes to the economy despite soaring personal debt. That's the conclusion
British Columbia is losing jobs faster than anywhere else in the country, say numbers released by Statistics Canada. The