HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

BC teachers

When corruption and callous disregard for the marginalized can be so richly rewarded, what incentive do my students have for being good? When cheating does not preclude you from occupying the highest office in the province, why should they listen to my warnings about plagiarism?
I need to talk about education. About the premier's deflection of all questions about more than a decade's worth of underfunding. About how she keeps saying that B.C. students are ranked number one internationally for reading. Because the fact that we rank number one in reading means nothing.
Because of the B.C. Liberal government's legislation in 2002 and again in 2012, thousands of students lost the opportunity to have a school psychologist assess their learning disabilities as well as the opportunity to have their learning needs supported by education assistants.
As I have written previously, I am the spouse of a teacher and spend a lot of time with teachers. I'd like to start the new school year by reminding you of some truths about teachers. So if your child comes home and complains about something that happened at school give the teacher the benefit of the doubt.
Thirty years ago, school supply lists were quite short, perhaps just two items: pencil crayons and a geometry set. But for a number of years now, the lists have become very long and often include two types of paper: photocopying and toilet. How did we get to this point?
He was ordered to take a course on "respectful professional boundaries."
But my joyful relating of this good news will be dampened by the knowledge that there is no funding to make possible the full implementation of the new curriculum. It's as though my students have been given the keys to a car without any money for insurance or gas or maintenance or even driving lessons.
I didn't expect the province that I grew up in to have changed their priority on public education so much that there will be a lost generation of students.
The saddest part to me is how much of the public buy into the "lazy, greedy" teacher persona that our government portrays in an effort to justify its constant underfunding of our public schools.
Gerard MacIntosh was a North Vancouver principal and Grade 8 teacher.
As a mother of two high-school aged kids and an educational consultant, I see first-hand the struggles that students and parents face. With the new changes to the curriculum I see the potential for these challenges to increase exponentially.
Each time I tried to imagine what personalized learning would look like in overcrowded classrooms with outdated technology, my mind sent me 404 error messages. Nothing computed.
Things are worse. They are so much worse. I cannot express how bad things are getting. It's because I love the work so much, that I have to leave. I've spent the last two years thinking about going. I've felt increasingly sorrowful that I simply cannot do all that these kids need and deserve me to do.
If your child is willing to sit down and write a few words about what they enjoyed about this school year or semester, it would carry the weight of a dozen coffee mugs with fraction of the required storage space.
Now that Bill 11 has become law in B.C., giving the minister of education the power to determine what I do for my professional development, I'm looking forward to his plans to help me to deal with some challenges I have in my teaching practice. I have some questions that I hope he can answer.
Our government would love nothing more then for all of us to turn a blind eye to yet anther bill that will strip rights from students, teachers, and parents and help give our education minister more power and control over a system he knows little about.
B.C.'s Charter for Public Education is a public owned document, which stands as a testament to everything we as a community want and expect from our public school system. It is a document long forgotten somewhere between the never ending war against our public schools, funding cuts and dragged out court cases.
You see, standardized test results don't paint a full picture. And neither do my words here. You'll just have to come see for yourself.
The 13-year legal battle over class sizes in British Columbia should teach us that relying on the courts is not a winning strategy. After a decade of court battles, classes are as large as ever, funding on the decrease, and the teachers' strike fund depleted from legal costs.
With cuts to the number of school psychologists, waiting lists got longer and longer. And when choices had to be made between you and a student exhibiting violent behaviour in the classroom, your suspected reading disability was seen as less urgent. After all, you were funny and kind, not violent.