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bears

Once a year the internet votes for the fattest bear in Katmai National Park and Preserve.
It's a good lesson on keeping car doors locked.
B.C.'s Conservation Officer Service tweeted out the photo as a reminder to the public to not feed wild animals.
An Ontario, Canada, woman captured the moment a small black bear tried to enter her Dorion home on July 15. Marysol Deeley recorded as a young black bear turned up on her doorstep over the weekend. Deeley woke up early Saturday morning after she heard a bang and tapping on the bedroom window. She went out to investigate and found the animal. Deeley told CBC News she decided to capture the moment for her friends that don't live in the country and don't encounter wildlife up close. Credit: Marysol Deeley via Storyful
Good reminder to eat your fruits.
Because of you, a bear was killed. You kept making a mess. You kept leaving your garbage on the ground and in the shelter. You kept cooking in your campsite. You kept storing food in your tent and in your backpack. And the bear still couldn't resist. It was hungry and alone. And it kept coming back.
Killing more bears will do little to reduce nuisance bears while municipalities continue to allow plastic bags of garbage at curbside. Reducing attractants and learning to live with black bears is the solution -- not the expansion of a poorly monitored, scientifically unsupported and inhumane spring bear hunt.
"I just went right for the bear and stabbed him right between the shoulder blades," said the 15 year old.
WHEEEEE!
Yes, police had to remind people of this.
Who can resist a good swing?
Not only would the bill do nothing to stop, or even reduce, the recreational killing of grizzlies, it would end up providing cover for grizzly killers who would like nothing more than to be able to mischaracterize their trophy hunting of bears as a food hunt.
Complaining about not getting enough wildlife to kill, as compared to non-resident hunters, has been prominent in the BCWF's calculated messaging. In contrast, provincial mortality statistics show that from 1978 through 2011, resident hunters killed 5,900 grizzlies while non-resident hunters killed 4,100. To those 10,000 bears it was no consolation whether the bullets ripping through their bodies, causing immeasurable pain and suffering, were fired from the guns of resident or non-resident hunters.
There can be no doubt now that a recent viral photo of a grizzly bear standing on its hind legs to check out an expensive
A B.C. photographer is hoping his incredible shot of a grizzly bear toying with his camera equipment goes beyond a fleeting
"This is the last stop. There's small bits of populations to the south and in the U.S and, if we cut them off they are hooped."
Did you ever think it'd be great to see a bear up close? Cool, right? Yes. But also, no. Alberta Parks released a video Monday
Like Us On Facebook Angelika and Peter Langen from NLWS left Smithers on Saturday evening for the 1,200-km. trip, taking
Bears are iconic symbols and charismatic ambassadors for B.C.'s wilderness.