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Bill Clinton

His political career spanned four decades.
It used to be that the United States had a national purpose and a sense of community. For years, America had a commitment to common social goals as evidenced by Roosevelt's New Deal, Kennedy's New Frontier and Johnson's Great Society. That now seems a distant memory. After the Reagan-Bush years came Bill Clinton and another decade of selfishness and corporate greed. Although the books were eventually balanced, it was at the expense of the neediest as the gap between the haves and the have-nots widened into a chasm.
After all this time, and all that exposure, he's never explained how he'll get any of his proposed initiatives accomplished. He hasn't even been clear about what those initiatives are. What has come through loud and clear since the beginning, is that he's deranged, incompetent and dangerous -- and there's a frighteningly large number of Americans who love him for it.
Shimon Peres was the last towering figure from Israel's founding generation -- and he is now gone. But in a very real sense he lives on by providing us an example of how one can cast off positions in the face of changing circumstances. And to be courageous. And to dare to dream that we can one day have peace on earth.
From the makers of Pokémon GO comes a brand new augmented political reality game called Élection GO. Élection GO allows you to travel between the real world and the virtual world of American politics to create your own new world of Élection characters.
This is awkward.
Hillary Clinton could not be in a better position for the November election. Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders, who appear to stand in her way, are actually helping her to position herself for victory. Issues and ideology aside Hillary is way ahead of the pack in the the game of political chess and should have no trouble winning in November.
Far from spearheading democratic governance, the new breed have built ruthless totalitarian regimes to a varying degree. Of the quartet Eritrea is the most closed and most repressive, routinely denying its people access to the outside world. Since independence from Ethiopia in 1993 Eritrea has been ruled by as a one-party state headed by Afewerki, who tolerates no opposition.
Here is the irony of ironies. Over a decade earlier, U.S. President Bill Clinton failed in his attempt to use immunity argument for a sitting head of state in a sexual harassment case that pre-dated his term in office. In May 1997, the U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that "the President, like all other government officials, is subject to the same laws that apply to all other members of our society."
Again and again, Canadians have looked beyond those words and judged him based on his era, with his contemporaries and gave much weight to his signature public service contribution as the father-of-Medicare in later years. If we were to look at him by the standard we hold today, he would absolutely not survive the scrutiny.
For the longest time, councillor Doug Ford has often been uttering one of the least intelligent statements about blacks in Toronto. In defending the shortcomings of his brother, Mayor Rob Ford, he often remarks how "Rob Ford has done more for the black community than the hundreds of black leaders in the community." I beg to differ.
In the annals of human evil, Rwanda's genocide takes a special place. With a kill rate of about six people a minute for more than three months, it's likely one of the fastest mass slaughters of humans in history. Most were hacked to death by machete, partly because the perpetrators found it cheaper than using bullets.
I always thought that when the United States elected its first female president that it would be a nail biter -- a down-to-the-wire race that would keep us up late on election night before it was official. But Hillary Clinton's presidency is shaping up to be a coronation.
Another day, another take on Robin Thicke's increasingly inescapable song-of-the-summer 'Blurred Lines.' But this one is
"None of us can solve the whole problem -- but together, we can move the world," spoke Bill Clinton at the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) America in Chicago last week. Clinton challenges business, government, not-for-profits and foundations to figure out collaborative solutions to the big, complex problems that face society.
When I received an invitation to join President Clinton and a delegation in Haiti on an agricultural trade mission, I looked at the list of large philanthropic corporations from Heineken to Pepsi and at first thought, "How did I get on this powerful list of investors?" I am not a big corporation. I run my small Canadian fragrance company, The 7 Virtues, and we buy essential oils to empower rebuilding nations.
This is the magic of Davos. Participants find themselves seated beside a tycoon at breakfast, a Nobel Prize winner at lunch and a President, potentate or a future crook at dinner.
President Barack Obama and his twin enjoy rock 'n' roll drag racing. At least they appear to in a new claymation video for
Animal lovers and anyone with half a heart aren't the only people who have been traumatized by Sarah McLachlan's devastating
This need for an inter-generational politics is especially relevant in the context of an interesting debate that has been playing out in the Globe and Mail on the topic of youth engagement in politics. It is great to see this debate in a major Canadian newspaper and especially with youth themselves as the protagonists.