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birth plan

If you tell someone you are planning an unmedicated birth, you are met with a grin and nod in that "uh-huh, you are going to be begging for an epidural" kind of way. If you say you are planning an epidural, they wax poetic about the joys of unmedicated birth. Everyone has an opinion on your birth, and it is almost always going to be the opposite of yours.
Having a baby, or babies, is unpredictable. They are their own person and it is always harder to plan around someone else, especially when they cannot tell you their agenda. It is not always possible to just "go with the flow"; so having plans in place can help you to adjust when things are not working.
Right before we were about to leave, I felt the strongest baby kick I have ever felt. It took my breath away. I looked at my husband in shock. I knew at that moment we weren't going home. I stood up and whoooooosh, my water broke.
My delivery was going to be natural (no medical intervention), I would try and stay at home for the bulk of my pre-labour and only go to the hospital when necessary, we wouldn't give formula. Neither of us gave our "plan" a second thought. And then it started... the unexpected. This was not how it was supposed to happen.
Getting an epidural is a very individual decision and probably one of the first ones that we, as mothers, feel conflicted about. I wonder if this is due to our actual expectations around our child's birth or if it is how we think we will be perceived if we opt in (or out) of using drugs to manage labour.