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boston marathon 2013

United through the veil of one moment in time, social media displays the true essence of humanity. Victims. Heroes. Defenders. Defenceless. All represented in the eyes of the world wide web in a myriad of captions, comments, pictures, and paintings.
I remember a day in September, 2001, that shifted my world. I watched it unfold in front of me, two planes crashing into two towers, and all the pain and grief and disbelief that followed. I remember watching my daughter, just two days before her second birthday, and thinking that even though she was far too young to realize it her world had forever been altered.
The bombings at the finish line of the Boston Marathon has rocked the nation. Many children overheard their parents talking about it, or caught a glance of the news coverage. How does a parent effectively discuss the event of today? I have a few suggestions, based on some psychological tenants to help guide you.
At its very core, the marathon is about overcoming. The spirit of the marathon burns inside the people who run it. Most will have another opportunity to take on the marathon and they'll get to cross the line and revel in their accomplishment at another event or in Boston next year. Some won't, and that is truly tragic.
Chris Kavanagh knows that he was very lucky. Kavanagh, an 62-year old sales consultant from Oakville, Ont. crossed the Boston
An Edmonton man reportedly crossed the finish line at the Boston Marathon minutes before explosions at the world-renowned
Rob Watson’s first Boston Marathon will be forever etched in his memory, but the elation he felt as the top Canadian racer