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branding

Canada's biggest brands are struggling to make an impact on the outside world, a new ranking shows.
Recently proposed restrictions on branding and logos, as well as exhaustive warning requirements, won't benefit legal cannabis users.
Most of the discussion has circled two main talking points: the cost of the logo, and how boring or "bad" it is.
If you're in sales at a small business, reaching out to potential customers can be a formidable necessity. Most salespeople
This has been top of mind for me since we unveiled Primus' new brand last fall. Having spent a considerable amount of time serving the telecom needs of many small businesses, I realized that there are lessons from our own experience that are helpful to any entrepreneur trying to stand out from the pack.
Content marketing is essential for bringing organic traffic to your website. When you publish high-quality content though, you're more likely to get readers to share it. Over time, a steady stream of good content can dramatically boost your brand recognition and the amount of business you have.
As the CEO of a North American experiential marketing agency, I have a tendency to chronically think about marketing as a whole -- its past, present, and future. With the explosive growth of internet-based marketing approaches, some executives and marketing managers have wondered about the role of brand ambassadors in this new advertising landscape. Do companies still need brand ambassadors for effective marketing? Or are brand ambassadors rendered obsolete by the Digital Age?
In business you hear the term “personal brand” thrown around a lot. It’s a process by which you define how the world sees you. It’s seemingly a straightforward task but often the most important thing a new business owner will do.
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The Lady Gaga we fell in love with 10 years ago is back and better than ever. The icon who carved out an indelible brand persona has finally returned to her fans, her roots, her senses, and to her betrothed little monsters. She has reclaimed her trademark pedigree that made her the irrepressible image we all fell in love with. And she did it without any outside help or needless controversy.
This year, in addition to the great work that we're doing on behalf of clients, let's make a commitment to look inward and focus on expertly communicating our own brand stories.
As a business owner and communications industry veteran, Jean-Pierre Lacroix, President of Shikatani Lacroix, a Toronto-based
As a business owner and communications industry veteran, Jean-Pierre Lacroix, President of Shikatani Lacroix, a Toronto-based
One thing is clear from this year's presidential race: Donald Trump has built an incredibly recognizable brand. He's stamped his name on so many things -- from buildings around the world to steaks for sale at The Sharper Image -- that some American voters associate him with wealth and success.
Branding is about more than image recognition for customers. Great brands give their customers something to belong to and talk about. They always have a great story. I was reminded of that last week while in Ontario cottage country visiting relatives and friends before returning to Toronto for some business meetings.
There is a vast gulf growing between younger generations, who want genuine purpose in their work, and older generations (their
When faced with any decision, always ask first, "What would Future Me choose?" That's how you get to where want to go. By making decisions not from where you are, but from that place of your envisioned success.
New digital personalities pop up daily and although we often hear about the PR behaviours that annoy bloggers and influencers, it's also important for us to recognize some of the shady influencer behaviours that can leave a communicator frustrated and far from their PR goals.
It seems incredibly naïve to think that a profit-dependent, commercial venture is the final bastion of democratic values. Yet, in an age when companies are capitalizing on social responsibility, are brands unwittingly turning themselves into moral pedestals?
It's a common experience among many communications professionals: after helping an organization build its brand reputation during good times, we often see our efforts unravel the moment an economic downturn hits and senior management decides to cut spending on brand communications. It's understandable. But it's also a mistake, since difficult times are exactly when an organization should remain visible and emphasize its brand.
Dear 20-something, you're being judged. You just don't know it. You have somehow managed to graduate from high school, and in some cases college and university, without knowing how to use to, too and two. You mix up were, where and wear as well as there, their and they're. Notice how I said you're being judged? Not your being judged?