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British politics

One image remained with me: Cox's shoe, lying on its side, even after her body was removed. A powerful woman once filled that shoe. She was no regular political aspirant, but a true believer in the nobility of humanity and its capacity for hope and change.
The senseless killing of British MP Jo Cox is "a manifestation of a coarseness in our politics and hatred toward the other that we must not tolerate." That from American politician Gabby Giffords, herself the target of an assassination attempt. We must do better. We must hold each other to account. We must condemn threats against women in politics, because the death of Jo Cox shows what can happen when threats are actualized. We must not let threatening, misogynistic, or hateful discourse online or elsewhere go unopposed. We must not let hate win and we must not let people try to tell us that we cannot be better.
Below the surface of the proposed British exit from the European Union is a sense of great consternation in the smaller countries that make up the United Kingdom. Having lived, studied and worked throughout the U.K. for the past two years, the divisions within the country are striking and broader than most North Americans realize.
The "big tent" factor of both American parties and the constraints of the "winner-take-all" presidency makes for some particularly strange bedfellows. But is the two-party system under attack this election cycle? It certainly seems so -- and it could well be to Secretary Hillary Clinton's advantage.
In Canada, Stephen Harper led two minority governments before his 2011 win gave him a solid majority. Britain's David Cameron became prime minister in 2010 by virtue of a coalition with the Liberal Democrats and would clearly prefer a majority of his own. ‎By imitating Harper's Canadian Crunch, he may have improved his chances.