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business advice

Experience has shown me that the key to a happy summer is avoiding the tendency to worry about work when you're on holiday and wishing you were on holiday when you're working. That entails finding a work-life balance and can be easier said than done, regardless of whether you are an independent business owner or an employee.
As someone with ADHD, who grew up with reading difficulties, sitting down with a book was never my go-to pastime. I preferred hands-on learning over classroom education -- so when I traded in my textbooks to run my own business, I don't think anyone was surprised. But even though I believe experience is the best teacher, there are always opportunities to learn from the experts (whether you're in startup or 30 years into your business).
Our fast-paced lives often require us to make decisions on the fly with little consideration of why we are doing what we do and even less consideration of the long-term impact of those decisions. Clarity acts as a steady light beam that guides us to the right decision -- in our business or personal lives. It helps us identify our goals and precisely when we want to achieve them.
As a business owner or team lead, you may like the fact that some clients prefer to work with you over others in your organization. It's a testament to your professional skills and your ability to earn trust. In many cases, yours is the only advice they will seek or accept and you feel responsible for their well being as they continue to play a large role in your success.
The reality is you will need a good mix of both digital and traditional tactics when reaching out to prospects. Researching your audience to determine how they like to receive their information is key before proceeding.
When I was younger, I didn't really think I'd end up being an entrepreneur and running my own companies. But seven years ago, I found something that keeps me up at night, gives me butterflies whenever I think about it and is something I'm willing sacrifice anything for.
Regardless of the scope or nature of your business or profession, your leadership skills will ultimately determine your success or failure. Leadership skills are based on a sound, personal vision or foundation. They invite others to support you in effectively communicating your vision, ideally to everyone's betterment.
Gossip. It happens in every workplace and in every family. For some reason, we just love to talk about others. Perhaps it makes us feel better about ourselves, and maybe it reassures us that no one is perfect. Whatever the case, it can make for some pretty interesting lunch conversation.
Organizational best practices are becoming a driving force behind the transparency movement and a way for firms to lend greater weight to their performance.
Business is really hard. Being successful is even harder. But, through all the bad days, all the mistakes, all the lessons learned, all the doubts and all the worries, if you can get up and do it anyway, it's worth it. All the sacrifices you need to make, all the sleep you won't get and all the money you won't see for awhile... it'll come.
We've all heard the phrase, "Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free." That's the premise here. Why would someone pay for your services when you are giving your best advice without charging for it? We need to strike a balance between showcasing the highlights of our services while also charging a set dollar figure for the real meat.
We all feel "stuck" from time to time -- when your personal brand suddenly (but hopefully temporarily) loses much of its appeal to prospects, clients, and yourself. You are stuck in a rut and it's time to figure out what grounded you and then get airborne again. Here are three potential scenarios to help you get back on track.
The trouble with innovation, though, is that it isn't easy. Creating the next big thing requires the stars to align. Hard work and luck are both parts of the equation, but there's another trait that makes innovation possible -- creativity. Creativity is the key to innovation, and it's what makes entrepreneur culture so enticing.
We often associate taking risk and embracing failure as components of being innovative. However, both are components of being innovative and opportunistic. You can be opportunistic and still take risk. You can be opportunistic and still fail. The main difference is your approach.
When I see a small business plugging away all the while continuing their charitable and community-spirited endeavours (often in the face of near-insurmountable odds), it behooves all of us to reconsider what it means to be "productive."
In the 1992 film A League of Their Own, Tom Hanks' character, a coach, responds to a female player who started to cry almost uncontrollably when she couldn't handle the criticism, yelling: "There's No Crying In Baseball!! THERE'S NO CRYING IN BASEBALL!!!!"
Like most couples, we have certain labels we've come to own over time. I, for example, am the visionary, the queen of creative chaos. I bring fire, optimism and 10 ideas a minute to each conversation. Meanwhile, Pat is producer, the king of structure. He is organized, dependable, a genius at follow through.
When I started my business, my purpose was clear: to leverage my communications skills in order to become wealthy. I learned that unexpected things happen along the way and I needed to live by some non-negotiable beliefs if I was to be happy in my work. So, three decades later I am still learning. This is where I've learned thus far.
While large corporations based in B.C. — such as Hootsuite, Lululemon and MEC — often dominate the news, we shouldn't overlook
Plainly, even if you think you have connections -- you likely don't. It is not unless you have made a connection to someone...you developed that connection through a number of interactions, that you might be able to call them a connection. This matters not though.