HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

cable tv

More and more media companies are jumping into the streaming game, and that could cost consumers.
But there's one thing keeping many viewers from cutting the cord altogether.
Video killed the radio in 1979, now in 2017 our generation is killing traditional television viewing with a steady decline in cable subscription as more Canadians use their online devices (and televisions) to stream digital content from services such as Netflix, Crave and Amazon Prime Video.
For $35 a month, YouTube subscribers will be able to replace cable TV.
And some customers are not happy.
But cord-cutting still isn't hurting cable company profits in Canada.
CBC ran a story this weekend about HBO's angry letter blitz, where the network has been sending out copyright notices to Canadians asking them to please stop pirating Game of Thrones. There are plenty of legit ways to get the acclaimed fantasy adventure show, the network says -- except that there aren't.
"There's nothing good on TV these days."
Canadian TV providers are losing customers six times faster this year than they did last year, according to new research
There has been “a sharp increase in prices” in telecom services, and with an economic slowdown and growing debt burdens hanging
Cord-cutting, combined with more consumer-friendly rules from the CRTC, will send Canada’s telecoms into a TV-services “bloodbath
TiVo, the set-top box that lets Americans record live TV to watch later, has landed in Canada. Cogeco Cable, which only operates
The real question people are starting to ask: why pay for a lot of channels with so many commercials? CBC, which is now mostly funded by taxpayers, and any other network with a business model that can eliminate or at least reduce ads, can flourish in this new environment. That is, by giving viewers what they really want, programs, not commercials.
No wonder Shaw and Rogers, the two largest cable TV providers in Canada, recently joined forces to create a Netflix competitor
CBS and HBO's move to streaming highlights a new reality that's hard for many telecom execs to accept: That the one thing we don't need in television's digital future is cable TV. How the big telecoms react to the coming obsolescence of cable TV will play a large role in shaping the future of Canada's entertainment industry. Let's hope they don't keep us stuck in the channel-flipping past for too long.
In news likely to cause Canada’s telecom executives to break out in cold sweats, a poll has found Canadians strongly support
For the first time ever, the number of households in Canada paying for TV has shrunk, raising the possibility that the phenomenon
One of the great ironies in Canadian TV is that a large majority of Canadians think that a high percentage of their monthly cable bill already goes to CBC. In our most recent survey, about 1 in 4 thought that 25 per cent or more went to local stations. In other words, Canadians already think there is a cable tax!
As the Great Wireless War of this past summer cools off, Bell Canada has signalled it’s willing to get into another dispute
The newspaper industry has yet to come to terms with the Internet. With decreasing circulation figures and declining ad revenues, daily papers haven't figured out how to turn a profit from their online readership. There have been numerous attempts at getting online users to pay, few of which have worked.