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Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Watching the CBC's 10-part television series Canada: The Story Of Us had me figuratively scratching my head. It left me flabbergasted and astounded. Critics have decried the series' anglo-centric slant on history. Respect should come from all sides, beginning with cordiality, recognition and representation.
Subway's chicken is barely more than half chicken DNA, researchers claimed.
So there was this CBC-Angus Reid poll. You may have heard about it, or at least seen it while scrolling through your social media feeds this week. It was called the "Canadian Values" poll and it found, according to the original CBC headline, that Canadians want minorities to do more to 'fit in.' This poll made news because it revealed 68 per cent of Canadians thinking minorities should be "doing more to fit in" with mainstream society instead of keeping their own customs and languages. But what I found out after contacting Angus Reid was that 87 per cent of those respondents were white.
The CBC's fateful decision to move the national news and the long series of ill-formed, unaccountable decisions since then, makes it clear that an inexperienced, government-appointed president and board of directors is a root problem. The government's review should address this problem.
My advice to CBC brass is to not pick a replacement for Mansbridge just yet, but go back to the drawing board and see if they can design a new way to report the news that will address real journalistic concerns facing the nation, rather than simply reapplying lipstick to a format that needs to be retired along with its icon.
Media managers are wondering what went wrong. They are asking why journalism doesn't pay any more. If the solutions are hard to discern, they have only to look at the technology they so eagerly embrace. It's the digital technology. It has spread throughout many industries including journalism, like a virus.
At a time when our consumption of the news is at an all-time high, the very institutions at the heart of our news media are in crisis -- and demanding the attention of our political leaders. Postmedia combined newsrooms in Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver in a move that not only saw many talented and dedicated journalists pushed out the door, but also saw distinctive voices quieted.
For many HuffPost readers, the oil industry is far away (in Alberta) and out of mind (except at the gas station). But the
Despite the incoming Liberal government’s vow to reverse funding reductions to the CBC, the broadcaster’s top brass are still
"The decision to close down production centres is of great concern for our members as it should be for all Canadians."
The president of CBC/Radio-Canada says public broadcasters are caught in a “vicious circle” of budget cuts and service reductions
The Canadian Broadcasting Corp. has been sued in U.S. federal court over its use of a 31-second YouTube clip of a snowstorm
A leaked document from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade talks indicates the CBC, Canada Post and other Crown corporations
The CBC has asked YouTube and Facebook to remove the Conservative Party’s latest attack ad against Liberal Leader Justin
The public interest group Friends of Canadian Broadcasting (FCB) says no major TV station owners in Canada are willing to
Adapted for the small screen, The Book of Negroes' Canadian debut occurs one month ahead of the U.S.A. premiere, appositely scheduled for Black History Month. As with any historical film depicting the bowels of inhumanity towards people of colour, it is an uneasy subject matter for the mostly lily-white CBC personalities.
The CBC I'm leaving is a shadow of the CBC I joined. In 1976, I joined an institution which was a place for young Canadians to grow and, eventually, contribute to the country in diverse ways. I'm leaving a place where people struggle to survive professionally and, sad to say in many cases -- psychologically and emotionally. The difference can be explained to a very great extent by funding cutbacks driven largely by political hostility which has resulted in a hemorrhage of brains and talent from the corporation.
We only learned post facto that CBC planned on achieving its objectives for TV by stripping more than a quarter of the funding from its radio services. How? Fortuitously, another law came into effect in 2008 that required CBC and other broadcasters to provide financial data to the CRTC on their major radio and TV operations.
If the CBC has indeed fired an employee for private behaviour in the bedroom then Ghomeshi deserves the entire 50 million dollar settlement and those who made the decision at the CBC should immediately resign. If, on the other hand, there is a legitimate victim of a crime who is driven into hiding because people like a radio host, it will be a great miscarriage of justice by the Canadian public.
Thompson Rivers UniversityPeter Mansbridge, host of CBC Television's The National, regales the audience with tales from his