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Canadian Constitution Foundation

Every province with vaping legislation treats e-cigarettes as if they are similar in harm to smoking, encouraging the public to think that vaping is not appreciably different than smoking. This misinformation, actual or implied, is especially pernicious when it comes from the government.
The plaintiffs' constitutional challenge is straightforward: if the government does not provide timely medical treatment, then it cannot at the same time legally prohibit patients who are suffering on long wait lists from taking control of their own health care and arranging treatment privately.
Tradition is the right word for the appointment in other ways. While most court watchers confidently predicted an aboriginal appointee, a woman, or both, Mr Trudeau confounded speculation by choosing an experienced, older white man. The traditional diversity markers of region and language won out over more recent preoccupations with race and sex.
B.C. law prohibits residents from accessing private insurance to pay for medically necessary treatment in B.C. These prohibitions, together with the province's rationing of health-care services, has resulted in long waiting lists. Many residents in urgent need are forced to languish, suffering irreparable harm and risking death.
Even before Canada's Premiers departed Whitehorse on Friday, media coverage was applauding a "ground-breaking" and "historic" agreement on internal trade within Canada. Not so fast. One key omission was immediately evident. When it comes to alcohol, the agreement will establish "a working group on alcoholic beverages, which will explore opportunities to improve trade in beer, wine and spirits across Canada."
On October 29, the Calgary Herald reported that big changes would be coming that will affect craft brewing in the province. Brewers from Alberta, Saskatchewan, and B.C. would receive favoured treatment while beer originating from outside of these provinces will be taxed 20 to 30 per cent more than suds originating from within.
In modern Canada, trade in beer is tightly controlled by our governments. In many ways, prohibition era sentiments still imbue how it's regulated. According to federal law, the only beer permitted to cross provincial borders must be purchased by or on behalf of an agent of the Crown. It's this federal law that created Canada's provincial liquor monopolies.
Last week, a Canadian sheep farmer, Montana Jones, reported 41 of her sheep had been stolen.
Popular radio personality and former MuchMusic VJ Terry David Mulligan experimented with civil disobedience in May of this