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Canadian education

"Those vulnerabilities will be fully exposed in the next economic downturn. The time to act is now."
A high-quality education's effectiveness is determined by the quality of its teachers - teacher education, skills and training.
Our beaten-down education system's in desperate need of good teachers, and the only way to achieve this is to make B.Ed. acceptance criteria more stringent.
Many parents and students think it's okay to take it easy until grade eleven because that's when universities start to look at grades. And once grade eleven hits, parents will often advocate for higher grades from their beleaguered school teachers. That's where the trouble begins.
Across Canada, education systems differ from each other in surprising ways.
In Canada, organizations like the Society for Quality Education have been fighting for improvements. But Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia have resisted efforts by them and others to return to traditional methods of teaching mathematics despite the fact that Canadian students are falling behind, according to OECD global results in 65 nations.
It's hard to ignore the disgruntled looks I have seen on people's faces in buses and coffee shops now that the city has been overrun by other people having conversations about Marxism. Over the years, it has gotten so bad, whole books have been written asking, "Whither humanities?"
In Chad there is one primary school teacher for every 1,815 children, and in Mali, only half of all primary teachers are trained. Consider the quality (or lack thereof) of education within the classroom in areas of our world where students do not have access to trained teachers.
The distorted media coverage in the anglophone press of the Quebec student protest movement is perplexing. Some media pundits in the anglophone press not only fail to accurately present what is happening, but also use the occasion to express public disdain of Quebec social programs and of much of what Quebec society arguably stands for.