HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Canadian wine

There's nothing like a cold, thirst quenching Riesling with racy acidity by the pool. A Sparkling wine is never wrong in a perfectly chilled flute for Sunday brunch or afternoon tea and a slightly chilled rich Chardonnay is the perfect heat busting nightcap.
This year's slogan i LIVE Chardonnay was seen everywhere at the Festival including the T-shirts of 203 plus volunteers. I
Easter long weekend with a new VINTAGES release hopping in to your local LCBO on April 4th. Our family and friends will gather around Easter feasts and no matter what is on offer -- turkey, ham, lamb, Prime Rib or fish -- VINTAGES has plenty of wine for a hippity-hoppity Happy Easter.
The festival is increasingly a tourism draw for oenophiles.
The VINTAGES section of your local LCBO may be a bit of a mystery to you. The name itself suggests "Wine Snobs Only Please." Yes, VINTAGES is classed as the fine wine and premium spirits business of the LCBO, but excellent value limited quantity wines can be found if you venture inside.
When the glitterati stream out of town and the Toronto International Film Festival draws the curtain on its 2014 edition
John Szabo was the first Canadian to add the "Master Sommelier" credential to his name and is one of 188 master sommeliers currently sipping wine worldwide. Here John Szabo tells us about his hidden talents, favourite food and essential kitchen tools.
There's just something about the frosty weather -- and yes, the seemingly never-ending days of winter -- that makes uncorking a bottle feel that much more decadent, and gives you a chance to learn a bit more about what's contained inside.
As winter sets in and holiday cocktails feel like distant memories, it can be the perfect time to investigate some of the better wine options available to Canadians. While most people tend to lean toward red wines in the winter, there's also a little something for port lovers too.
Canadian provinces are now free to set their own policies for wine trade without the federal government imposing any rules of its own. Provinces are still only giving an inch, allowing for tourists from other provinces to bring back some wine and alcohol with them. And would you like to know why? Taxes.
Ontario’s wine makers are fighting to protect their grapes against Mother Nature’s wrath. The destructive forces of climate