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car insurance

These myths confuse consumers about what actually affects their rates, and consumers who aren't informed are likely not getting the best deals.
December is here and no matter where you live in Canada, the days have gotten shorter and cooler, and you may have already experienced snowfall. While you can't always predict the weather, it's pretty much guaranteed that you'll have to face at least a few storms during the winter season. And whether you're a veteran in driving under extreme weather conditions or you're still getting used to the feel of a snow-covered road, it's important to prep yourself -- and your car -- for what's ahead.
When it comes down to it, an electric car can actually save you thousands of dollars down the road when it comes to fuel costs. In addition, some provinces have launched incentive campaigns to help drivers subsidize the initial purchase price. In Ontario for example, drivers can save up to $13,000 on eligible vehicles thanks to incentives.
It's the most wonderful time of the year for motorists -- or so you would think. Despite not having to deal with snow or ice on our roads, there's actually a spike of driving tickets and a rise in collisions in July, August and September.
Growing up, my dad was a big points collector and as a result my family was able to book many flights and hotel stays free of charge. We used to always joke that a hotel was twice as nice if you didn't have to pay the bill. Those lessons have remained with me to this day and have inspired my passion for credit card rewards.
You've probably heard that buying a car is one of the worst investments you can make. Reports suggest Canadians spend more than $5,000 a year on maintenance and gas, not to mention tickets, driver's licence and plate renewals, parking and insurance. But does it really have to be this way?
modern winter tires offer up to 50 per cent more traction than all-seasons, and it's estimated that they'll shorten your braking distance by as much 25 per cent. It's widely reported that winter tires simply handle winter weather conditions better than all-seasons, and from personal experience, I'm a believer.
I'm sure that most of you have experienced the feeling of having to be somewhere by a certain time, only to get on the road and face terrible traffic and road closures due to car accidents. A question that I get asked frequently is "which car is at fault for my car accident?" While in some scenarios, the answer is easy, usually the answer is...it depends.
Canadians are typically known for being polite, apologetic and careful. But when it comes to insurance, a new Leger research study commissioned for PC Insurance, suggests we're not always following the rules -- or playing it safe.
The administrators of Quebec's no-fault automobile insurance plan receive more than 20,000 requests for compensation a year