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centre for addiction and mental health

They help patients return to a state of well-being.
It's bad enough that Professor Bonnie Burstow at the University of Toronto is the head of anti-psychiatry and the purveyor of an anti-psychiatry scholarship, but it goes well beyond that. She is actively attacking research and proud of it.
I've been waiting a long time for a book like"How Can I Help? A Week in My Life as a Psychiatrist." Written by psychiatrists David Goldbloom and Pier Bryden, this book is the most thorough account I have seen of the thinking process, or what should be the thinking process, of contemporary psychiatrists. And it can change the entire way you go about asking for, and receiving, help from a mental health professional.
Sam MacCulloch thought the hardest part about being transgender would be accepting the fact, or coming out to his friends
Science may not be as well advanced in the treatment of the most serious of mental illnesses as they are in other areas but, hopefully, we will get there sooner than later. But that goal will be achieved by scientists some of whom work at CAMH and not by those suggesting we convene a group of people with lived experience to solve these puzzles.
Here is where I have a problem with CAMH itself. Earlier this year, they put a total tobacco ban in place. And, tobacco is a legal substance. Not only could patients not smoke on the property but they could not even have tobacco products in their lockers or rooms.
Patients in hospital are often receiving drug therapy and having the proper dose of medications that are optimally effective with minimal side effects determined. They are not allowed to smoke and then they are discharged and resume smoking at the same level as before hospitalization. As Dr O'Reilly pointed out, "the resumption of smoking can interfere with the effectiveness of their antipsychotic medication dose."
For as long as she could remember, Naomi wanted to run her own business. Inspired by a lack of good gluten-free food, she began to operate a small gluten-free bakery, CeleeakNak. After unsuccessful attempts to secure a small business loan, Naomi found Rise Asset Development who offered her financing based on the strength of her character, her work ethic and her business plan.
The month of May in Canada has in it one week devoted to mental illness awareness and one day devoted to schizophrenia awareness. But, nothing for the parents of the mentally ill who suffer almost as much as their children. We parents carry much of the burden for the care of our ill offspring but we are ignored. And, we are often ignored and shunned by the professionals.
Recently, Ottawa introduced Bill C-31, the Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act, and announced it was going to cut temporary health and mental health care to certain categories of refugees. The result was an outcry of support for people who have left everything they own to flee persecution, rape, torture and violence in their home country. Eliminating important supports and services from refugees is nothing short of inhumane. We're speaking out because the issue speaks to the heart of our purpose. We Care.