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charter of rights and freedoms

If passed, individual protesters could face fines of up to $25,000 per day.
Our freedom and Charter rights should be more important to us than ensuring that every criminal is apprehended.
Why is the right to be free from search and seizure so difficult to understand?
They remain thankful to be living in a country where their rights are safeguarded by the courts and by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
In his recent Globe and Mail Op/Ed piece Should Indigenous ancestry dictate public policy?, Tom Flanagan posits that assigning
In 2017, sex workers in Canada continue to live and work in unsafe conditions, face predatory and state violence, immigration raids, deportation, surveillance and arrest as well as see their human rights violated. Meaningful sex work law reform in Canada is long due.
Last week, legislation was tabled by our government, seeking to end the 94-year prohibition against the drug. But with it came with some unexpected proposal that are likely to be in conflict with our charter rights. These are the ones aimed at curbing impaired driving.
What is it about hair that ruffles so many feathers? Last week, despite having been told not to do so, an Ottawa teacher chopped the hair off a child, ostensibly because the child was chewing on it. The teacher appears to have believed that somehow, he was acting in the child's best interests. Had he decided the child's identity for him? Had he decided that a child with a disability cannot make his own choices as to his appearance?
The collection and dissemination of race-based statistics is essential to the examination and elimination of any racial disparities that may exist. By remaining uncommitted to this initiative, Canadian law enforcement has essentially shrugged its shoulders to the troubles many visible minority Canadians face.
As someone who has always been on the forefront of struggling against violent Islamic extremism in Canada and elsewhere, I
When Rebel Media sent out emails claiming that "Canada is on the verge of passing a law that would prohibit criticizing Islam" and that "If this motion passes, Canadians can be persecuted for expressing any criticism of Islam, even when warranted," I pointed out that M-103 is a motion, not a law, and that it will not change a single comma of existing speech legislation. Apparently, Prime Minister Trudeau disagrees.
Earlier this week, I received an email that offered me the chance to attend one of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's town halls. I am hard of hearing. I rely on lipreading. Normally, I shy away from any kind of talk or presentation. But the opportunity to see a sitting prime minister in person, and potentially ask him a question, spurred me to find out more.
In September 2015, Port Alberni mom Candice Servatius was shocked to learn that her two elementary-aged children had participated in an aboriginal smudging ceremony. The district claims that these are "cultural practices." This is true, but misses the point.
If winning cases before the Supreme Court of Canada could be likened to the National Hockey League, the B.C. government would be the Toronto Maple Leafs of litigants. Perhaps the government is getting bad legal advice? Perhaps it's not listening to good legal advice?
The plaintiffs' constitutional challenge is straightforward: if the government does not provide timely medical treatment, then it cannot at the same time legally prohibit patients who are suffering on long wait lists from taking control of their own health care and arranging treatment privately.
Tradition is the right word for the appointment in other ways. While most court watchers confidently predicted an aboriginal appointee, a woman, or both, Mr Trudeau confounded speculation by choosing an experienced, older white man. The traditional diversity markers of region and language won out over more recent preoccupations with race and sex.
People deserve to know and to understand what the Mental Health Act is about. They deserve to know the processes that are in place to commit someone against their will and to treat them. And they need to know the safeguards that are in place to prevent excesses and protect the rights of the individual.
The wedge politics and fearmongering of the Conservatives in the last election were resoundingly rejected by Canadians. Whether it is Kellie Leitch playing to xenophobia with her values test or Tony Clement gleefully trampling our rights, it seems the Conservative Party still hasn't gotten the memo.
When it comes to standing up for gay rights, corporate outrage is rather selective. Large companies that have publicly denounced new laws in several southern U.S. states as "anti-gay" are quite happy to remain silent as they carry on business in countries that criminalize gay sex.
Whether included in an existing law such as the Canadian Environmental Protection Act or by way of a new statute, national and enforceable air pollution standards would be a step towards a more equitable society, in which disadvantaged communities aren't left bearing more than their fair share of the national environmental health burden.