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cheater

It can be really easy to live with a secret. Three and a half years ago I was living in Toronto's East end, long time boyfriend and cat at home. It wasn't long before I met someone who did more than wolf-whistle out a car window. One night a few of us went out dancing. Mid-twist he kissed me and all my senses were on fire. But innocent walks turned into conversations tinged with sexual innuendo. Alleyway makeout sessions, then sex -- anywhere we could. I found myself turning into this seemingly new person. People who have never cheated ask how you can do it mentally, emotionally. It's different for everyone. But what they don't understand is that it gets to the point where recklessness overpowers all logic and all sense of "right."
Cheating in committed relationships is more common than most of us would like to believe. Though the majority of Americans
I first heard the statement, "Once a cheater always a cheater" when I was in high school. Maybe some women are born with an innate desire to believe in the ability to change. I know I'm a little more evidence-based myself and if history is any indication, I'd say Don Draper will spend the rest of his fictional life appearing in the beds of women all over 1960s Manhattan.
Is this Oprah interview with Lance Armstrong a chance for the disgraced cyclist to publicly recognize his numerous wrongs, and seek forgiveness from his fans, or is it just another narcissistic attempt from someone who is backed in a corner trying to shift gears in the hopes rebooting his career?