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child behaviour

Studies have shown there's a correlation between chaotic homes and behavioural problems in kids.
Dozens of daycares in Quebec are being encouraged to allow children to roughhouse, rather than break it up. I was alarmed. Don't get me wrong: I'm all for roughhousing. I know that roughhousing is teaching my sons important life lessons. But those are places where kids should learn to resolve their conflicts with words, not fists.
One of a child's basic emotional needs is to be treated with respect. It sits at the heart of a strong parent-child connection, which is fundamental to healthy emotional development. We're capable of giving this to our children, but first, we need to recognize disrespectful behaviour and stamp it out before it jeopardizes our most precious relationships.
No kid comes with a guidebook. Kids with developmental disabilities of all kinds, both physical and neurological, are as diverse in thought, behaviour, strengths and weaknesses as their neuro-typical peers. With the added anxiety of raising very different children from what is expected, stress levels are higher, parenting is harder and divorce runs rampant among special needs parents. That is why it is so important for them to remain on the same side.
According to a new study, it doesn't pay to be nice.
Caregivers don't need great riches to support their children. A strong, supportive adult figure can help children overcome otherwise unhealthy environments. This figure need not even be the child's parents (though of course this helps). A grandparent, and aunt, a family friend, even a dedicated teacher can have a tangible, long-lasting impact on a child's development.