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child death

Emily was two and a half years old. She was a beautiful blonde toddler with a shy and quiet nature. For most of her life we lived in Niger. I always thought (and I still do) that it was a wonderful place for our children to grow up. I look back on the nine years we spent in Niger as among the happiest years of my life. I vividly remember the afternoon we spent relaxing at the pool of the old French club. Emily was full of life -- jumping and splashing in the pool with all the others. We went to church on the Sunday evening in a nearby village the night before she died.
A car is like a greenhouse and temperatures can rise very quickly, even with the windows open. There is no safe amount of time to leave a child (or pet) alone in the car. Children are especially vulnerable to heat-related injuries and aren't able to sweat as well as adults to cool down.
For Rosario, listening to people and involving them in the initiatives that they identify as important is a given when you see people as the key agents of change in their own lives. This is something she learned to do many years ago.
On a recent trip to the Canadian National Exhibition (CNE) today I was hit with scene after scene of moms, dads and other caregivers lighting up. In some cases, cigarettes dangling in the faces of some of these poor kids while mom had a chat with dad. One man held the door for us as we were exiting the Direct Energy Centre (nice thing to do); seemingly unaware, he blew smoke into my face, and into my daughter's who I was wearing in a baby carrier (not a nice thing to do). I was livid. I coughed dramatically and waved my hands wildly in the air.