HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

chores

Moms and dads paid a premium for lawn-mowing.
Women spend an hour more on housework every day, new data shows.
There are so many benefits to making kids do work.
I knew that buying a Bed and Breakfast meant learning to love household chores and maintenance even more than guest service
While enjoying a wholesome meal together is surely a worthy goal, family meal campaigners don't always acknowledge the work that goes into this achievement: the time demands, parenting challenges and financial burdens required to put good food on the table. These pressures exist daily, but for many of us-particularly women-- they come to a head during holidays.
At its worst, a dirty, dusty, moldy room can lead to allergy eruptions, and a disruption of a good night's sleep. If you've noticed that your child is sneezing or stuffed up every night at bedtime, or in the morning when they wake up, it may be because of allergens you can take steps to eliminate.
If you're a parent, you may be wondering when your children should start filing their own taxes. Even if they're still too young to take this on themselves, every child can benefit from a simple conversation about income, money management and how taxes come into play.
You might be surprised to learn that you don't just need to go to the gym or bundle up for a power walk to stay fit. Your daily chores can help burn calories and can add up to a personal fitness routine as well. There is a reason they call it housework. You can burn some serious calories during a marathon cleaning session.
There is so much hype about the holidays. Unfortunately, our romantic notions are too often dashed and replaced with resentment, exhaustion and financial stress. But it doesn't have to be that way. With a bit of compromise, perspective and goodwill, you can survive and even thrive as a dynamic duo.
Cleaning. It's a necessary evil. It's also one of the top excuses given when people are asked why they didn't fit a workout in. Too many chores. Vacuuming to be done. Dishes to wash. Loads of laundry to fold. The list goes on. Certainly those chores do indeed need to be done, but the incredible thing about fitness is that you can fit it in while you complete your household chores.
Although spring cleaning is a great way to herald in the new season, traditionally the bulk of the chores fall on mom (or dad). My advice? Spread the chores around by getting the kids involved. Even kids as young as five or six can pitch in so that when the temperatures do finally warm up outside, you won't be tied down and tired from too many chores inside.
I've never been very good at making lists. When I have been able to convince myself to make a list, it was rare that I was able to follow it -- until I became a stay-at-home mom. Sometimes a list can really help slow down the whirlwind. Here are some list tips from a person who doesn't do lists.
My boys were keeping score over everything and it drove me crazy. I was officially on strike. This meant I would be doing nothing. If they wanted food, they would have to prepare it, if they needed clean clothes, they would have to wash them. If they needed something at the store, they would have to walk to the store to get it. They would put themselves to bed. There would be no fun outings until the strike was over.
We didn't like them when we were kids and we don't like them now; after all, they don't call them chores for nothing. Unfortunately
Most of us like the idea of getting two for the price of one; after all, if you can knock off two frankly annoying tasks