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Christie Blatchford

Black writers can't be expected to continually argue and prove the very basics of their life experiences every time they're granted some space in a publication. Can you imagine a (non-female) sportswriter being quizzed by readers about the foundations of their sports knowledge? Yet open up any Canadian news piece about Black Lives Matter, Islamophobia, or misogyny, and I promise you'll see the equivalent.
I practised family law from 1985 to 2009 and was never so relieved in my life as when I finally stopped. From that vantage point, there were things that I was easily able to predict. One of them was that some men would be driven to suicide by the burdens the law thrust upon them.
2012-04-27-mediabitesreal.jpg As one of the key institutions of the federal government, it obviously makes sense for the Supreme Court to enjoy certain constitutional protections. But to decree that even modifying the resume criteria for the men and women who sit on it should require nothing short of a constitutional amendment is to cordon off yet another enormous realm of the broken Canadian political system from even the mildest tinkerings of common-sense improvement.
I'm no John Ivison, Christie Blatchford, Chantal Hebert, Ezra Levant, Christopher Hume, Andrew Coyne or Margaret Wente. Heck
I suppose crying over Jack's death makes me a member of what Christie Blatchford called "the mourning chaff;" those who make a spectacle out of a death they weren't affected by. I dislike this idea of a mourning hierarchy. This isn't a game of Who's the Saddest. This idea undermines how he affected Canadians.
(The Canadian Press) TORONTO - Postmedia Network Canada has announced that Christie Blatchford has left the Globe and Mail