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chronic illness

A dad shares advice on how to handle the hard days.
COVID-19 means accessibility has suddenly become everybody's priority. It should stay that way.
My two small children are learning compassion and empathy, and tolerance and acceptance for people who are different.
Each hospitalization has challenged me in ways that I could never have prepared myself for. Though such phases of pain and discomfort eventually pass, I live knowing the illness will reappear. But the more times I become sick, the more my strength and resilience deepen.
We cannot allow PharmaCare to force any of the 25,000 British Columbians living with Crohn's or colitis to give up a treatment that's working well in exchange for a lower cost alternative. This is a possibility in the province and a worrying prospect for people who have finally found stability.
By Joe Farago, Executive Director Healthcare Innovation at Innovative Medicines Canada It's tough to talk about mental illness
For many people, this is a time to leave bad habits behind and face the upcoming year with motivation and a new set of commitments. For those of us living with chronic disease however, we cannot escape the burden of our illness or the daily challenges we face.
Empathy, sadness, joy and a sense of family are just some of the immediate feelings I had when I ended my FaceTime conversation with Dan Reynolds, lead singer of Imagine Dragons. Dan and I have something in common called ankylosing spondylitis, or AS for short. Instead of getting into a long, drawn-out medical definition, I will describe it like this: our bodies are attacking themselves, and there is no cure. Most of us AS sufferers have to deal with chronic pain 24/7.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Over the last decade, researchers have gained insight into how certain gut microbes, particularly bacteria, influence our health. They have learned the mere presence of some species can affect us. Yet the majority of effects on wellness come as a result of the byproducts these organisms make.
Of the $220 billion spent on health care annually in Canada, 45 per cent is spent on those over 65 years old, although they only represent 15 per cent of the population. It's time we improved the quality and quantity of care delivered for frail Canadians - and improve the health system for everyone in the process.
As a disabled person, navigating Toronto is stressful and dangerous -- not just because of potholes and construction-brutalized sidewalks, but because of transit. And people. Especially people operating or riding transit. This is largely due to the absence of inclusion of pedestrians in the Ministry of Transportation's Accessibility Permit Program, currently only issued for drivers/passengers of cars, which leaves the rest of us vulnerable to harassment and injury.
The boundary established in Bill C-14 for reasonable foreseeability of natural death will serve as an essential safeguard to protect vulnerable persons from being induced to commit suicide through the system. From our perspective, anyone who is not dying, but who is nonetheless seeking death, is by definition vulnerable.
My migraines never reduced in frequency or intensity. I took over-the-counter and prescription drugs. It was not usual for me to take 8 muscle relaxants a day plus small amounts of prescription painkillers. My lifestyle was otherwise healthy. I did pilates 5 days a week, ate well and slept 8 hours a night. But 6 out of 7 days was a struggle. A struggle to be positive focused and upbeat at work many days when I just felt like banging my head down on my desk.
The health of Canada's indigenous people lags substantially behind other Canadians -- and the tragic reality is well documented. Sadly, the data regarding poor health status for indigenous populations shows us this is true across all major illnesses and across all age groups. In other words, being an indigenous person in Canada is too often a dangerous reality. But it doesn't have to be this way. These phenomena are not new, and while Canada has been good at documenting health crises, and collecting evidence, we've been poor at doing anything about it.
We don't have to give up all our guilty pleasures to be healthy. By focussing on wellness and becoming our own health advocates, we can enjoy all of what life has to offer, the idea being that disease prevention is easier than treatment. The fact is that there are some very common sense things we can do to make wellness and health a personal priority.
Just because you have HIV doesn't mean that life stops. There are still chores to do, friends to keep up with, jobs to perform, and family relationships to maintain. Sure, things you once took for granted may become more complicated in the face of HIV, but you don't need to give them up.
Staring up at the constellation Orion on a crisp winter's night, I wonder how much longer I can bear the pain. The pain of
Our genitalia experiences pleasure because of the interaction with our nerve endings. When experiencing pelvic zone pleasure in particular, much like osteopathy or yoga, FST helps to decompress your pelvis and open your hips to help expand not only range of motion, but the sensing of pleasure as well.
Dylan's chronic condition comes from an abnormal response from his body's immune system. It causes excruciating pain, with frequent trips to the washroom creating great embarrassment. In practical terms, it has influenced every aspect of his life, leading him to quit hockey, miss field trips, and decline invites to social outings.