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Civil War

It should have stayed there to remind us of our intertwined history with the U.S.
“No Trump, no KKK, no fascist USA!” the crowd chanted.
Washington, Jefferson and Jackson would still be honoured for their significant contributions but their slave-owning past would no longer be overlooked.
I hate to be impolite but it looks like your new president is a bit of a clown and your government is in disarray. Something's got to give and, with July 4th just around the corner, I've got a modest proposal that you might want to consider. Hear me out. Love, Canada.
Following the civil war, 260,000 Central African refugees found shelter in neighbouring Cameroon including 62 per cent of children, living in very precarious conditions in refugee camps or with host communities. More than 88,000 children are still not in school.
Picture calling your child aside for a private conversation. Look into their eyes, and take a big breath. Now imagine asking your child to leave. Not for a few days, and not to visit Grandma. Ask your son or daughter to walk until they find food or work. Just keep walking, even if it takes days, weeks or months.
The battle for civil rights eventually gave rise to such watershed moments as the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act and serious attempts at affirmative action. Sadly, some of those initiatives are even now being curtailed by an increasingly tone-deaf right wing majority on the Supreme Court.
Instead of asking our parents to change, why don't we change the situation that caused our parents to change -- poverty? Poverty in Sri Lanka has left many children on the streets scavenging for food, or should we say crumbs. What if I told you for $20 you can buy change -- change in the form of a future.
Yes the Syrian refugees that briefly broke our hearts are real people living a nightmare, but let's see even more, let us "think with history". Their situation, as any situation, was borne of consequence. They are a living mass of real life repercussions.
As a little girl growing up in the 1980s during the final years of Lebanon's 15-year civil war, my family often had to take shelter underground from these attacks. I can remember the sting of my fear, how I could almost smell it in my mother and father and siblings.