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clients

A client has referred you to someone who you think is an ideal prospect. Conversations have gone very well and they made a Request For Proposal (RFP). But somewhere along the way, something changed. Here's why.
Regardless of whether your ideal client is an independent business owner or part of a large organization, the time you spend in choosing the rights clients will put you further ahead in the long run than settling for work from those who don't "fit" you business model or professional value system.
When you need information or want to build a relationship with a client, colleague, team member, manager or stakeholder, it is really all about the questions you ask, how much you let the other person talk and how you listen.
The stress generated by unhealthy client relationships may eventually cause you to question your ability to run a business. If you don't value your skills, you may lose your resilience in the face of undue criticism, which can make you more vulnerable to being exploited.
Good referrals are the lifeblood of any business. We work hard to earn referrals from those we trust and are usually grateful when we receive them. Despite their best intentions, friends, colleagues, and clients (your advocates) sometimes refer us people we either aren't suited to help, or simply don't like.
If you aren't aware of your clients' changing needs, how can you make sure you're still meeting them? You need to make sure you are helping to solve your clients' business problems rather than just selling them your products. And how does your product offering stack up against a saturated market? Do you stand out?
It's great to work with someone who makes you feel important. Someone who remembers your name, and maybe that you have a dog named Brownie or that you recently took a vacation to Florida. When you work with someone like that, the time seems to fly and you look forward to working with them again.
Most people will need a lawyer at one point in their lives. Whether it is a home purchase or a will, a bankruptcy or a divorce, lawyers are a necessary part of our society. There are many different layers of client service within that framework, and every client wants to be treated as #1.
Because of "other people," so many ideas are never brought to fruition, which prevents them from ever at all being brought to the people that really count. "Other people" are often the airbrakes on the bullet train of progress.
As a former managing partner of a small law firm, some of my students ask me for advice about job interviews. This is the first part of an article offering such tips. There is no particular order to the tips. These tips, though catered to law school graduates, may be helpful to all job seekers.