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communication skills

While research increasingly places feeling valued and getting promoted on the same level as being well paid, we still need to feel we are being fairly paid. I have always felt that compensation is another way of keeping score and of measuring your professional value.
Silent prayer aside, there are many things that can derail your speaking awesomeness. Technology, traffic, timing, too-tight shoes and other terrible things can wreak havoc on the unprepared speaker. Luckily, most of these things can be avoided with a little planning.
Rather than taking control of the room, have you ever had self-doubt and a surge of discomfort envelope you as you are being introduced? Has your mouth suddenly gone dry and does the microphone always seem to act up? Do you ever lose concentration and draw a blank? These and other personal nervous habits often rear their heads when we are standing before an audience.
We're human, even at work. Which means that every now and again we're going to screw up. When that happens (and it will) apologize and do better next time. Not sure how to stumble through an apology at work? (Because... um, hello, awkward!) Here's how to get it right.
When most of us are asked what makes one a great communicator we usually emphasize speaking or writing ability. When in fact, the art of communicating rest with improving our passive listening. Active and passive listening are as different as listening and hearing.
I was consulting for a luxury car dealership not knowing what to expect. I'm one of those people who think "just get me from
Our message gets through only when we understand with whom we are communicating and their needs, the urgency of the message, and the desired next steps our message will trigger.
Last week I met Ani at a workshop I was giving. Ani is a very direct communicator and she feels strongly that her own blunt style of communication is best. She has no intention of changing her style and, in fact, has many reasons why she won't change.
We make three fundamental mistakes around communication that can really jeopardize an otherwise viable relationship, and there are three important communication skills that can make the difference between an unhappy break-up and an ongoing, happy relationship.
The problem for many parents is that they want to become friends with their children, rather than heroes. Our children do not need more friends, and they certainly do not need their parents competing with their friends for their attention. But as a hero, you can find a way to transform challenge into growth.
We don't see it much these days, but chivalry still matters, especially in the beginning stages of a relationship. It's always nice if a man opens the door for his date, offers his jacket on a chilly night, pulls out her chair, picks up the tab, and walks his date to the door and gives her a gentle kiss on the cheek (with no other expectations).
While seemingly daunting at first, asking for the business is a necessary occurrence if you are to grow and profit. You may not always hear "yes," but you won't know unless you ask. So what are you waiting for?
Since I was a little, I knew what I wanted to be: a journalist. My career aspirations helped define my personality and helped shape my world view. It influenced where I went to school, what I majored in, and who I hung out with -- until suddenly, one day, those aspirations changed.
Unfortunately, what tends to happen is that when they get triggered and react, we respond in kind. And it gets ugly. Welcome to the human race. In an ideal world, we all strive to staying rational when confronting, or confronted by, a difficult person, especially in the workplace. Here are five strategies that come in handy especially if your boss "goes medieval" on you.
So many people are hiding these days behind their devices, using efficiency and speed as just one of the many excuses to avoid direct communication. I don't purport to be the Emily Post of digital etiquette, but the following are times when some form of more intimate and potentially interactive communication may be preferable to their smart phone or tablet equivalent.
Of all the stories that interest me, the ones I follow the closest are the stories that last. I watch especially closely when those stories are pitched out by a brand. In today's incredibly rapid and completely democratized media landscape, there are a small number of campaigns that manage to create a lasting impact, and they are able to do this because they follow a solid recipe for success. Here are that recipe's four key ingredients:
How are you perceived? What do people say about you (after you leave the room)? This all depends on perception control -- in other words whether you are in control of the way you are perceived or not.
Sometimes our best intentions to build relationships and effectively connect fall by the wayside. But you should never allow the passage of time to hinder your potential. It's time to get into your email 'time machine' and put yourself back on their radar.
Let's face it, you need to network in this economy in order to get (or keep) the perfect job; but sometimes it looks as though the social individuals (extraverts) are the only ones moving ahead.