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conflict of interest

Both the prime minister and his chief of staff suggested they didn’t believe there was a conflict.
Testimony reveals PM’s connection to the charity was discussed around the cabinet table.
The prime minister is also under investigation in a separate probe.
Yet the federal ethics commissioner says she should not face sanctions.
One's mind goes back to arrogant Harper-era shenanigans such as the 'Fair' Elections Act. That was arrogance fuelled by the "we-know-better" attitude of the Harper regime, particularly in its later years. If one is not misreading its actions, there seems to be a similar degree of willful blindness in the moves of the Trudeau government.
In light of the prime minister's recent visit with the Aga Khan, a lot of people are asking questions about who the Aga Khan is and what his objectives are. This is a real scandal which raises real questions about Justin Trudeau's ethics. It in no way detracts from the charitable work of the Aga Khan. This scandal is about the prime minister's actions, not the Aga Khan's.
John Horgan didn't hold back while questioning Premier Christy Clark on a rather puzzling $150k donation, that ended up indirectly benefitting her brother. A donation that appears to have no paper trail, policy, or even a record that the request for the donation was ever made.
When most communities in B.C. have more in-camera meetings than the City of Toronto, there's a problem. In Ontario, councils are entitled to go in-camera to consider six specific matters. There are four reasons that councils must go in camera and over a dozen reasons why they "may" close a meeting. The nuance between "may" and "must" seems to have been lost on a few.
Should York University accept funding that is contingent upon agreeing to remove a controversial piece of art? Without the ability to explore and express ideas that are troubling and even transgressive, universities would become mills that deliver pre-approved doses of information in community sanctioned packets.
In management's view, Rex (one and two) is in such complete control of his perceptions and biases that he can switch from one personality to the other while walking from a radio studio on the third floor of the Broadcast Centre in Toronto to a TV studio on the fifth or to his kitchen to write a column for the National Post. That is obviously impossible, although convenient wishful thinking for CBC executives stuck in a pickle of their own making.
I don't care what Rex Murphy talks about. This is about good journalism and the abuse of privilege. So here's the problem to be faced by CBC managers and programmers who seem so committed to keeping Rex Murphy in the CBC public's eye and ear.
Oh, sorry. Were you waiting for something? It was back in early February when criticisms were first raised in the media about
A municipal politician told my graduate class when he spoke about accountability in public office this week that politicians
We've got to come clean about the unethical use of our retirement funds. There isn't enough money to expand the Canadian Pension Plan because the surplus was earmarked to boost the military-industrial complex. When our hard-earned money isn't being used to cause bloodshed, it's going to companies affiliated with the CPP's own CEOs and the Alberta oil sands.
I admire Wikipedia -- always have -- but how do the official gardeners at Wikipedia respond when they have a snake in their grass? In my case, a biased commenter is still an editor in good standing, but the people who pointed out his fraudulence have been mostly banned.
On a recent radio segment, Doug Ford boldly proclaimed, "There's no one that helps black youth more than Rob Ford," followed by, "These are kids who have nothing." If Mayor Ford really does hold the view that the black youths he helps have "nothing" without his football program, he is only furthering the sentiment that no matter how hard black people and communities work, they still have "nothing" if their hard work and perseverance is not supported by a white saviour.
As we know, Mr. Duceppe pulled out of his radio gig before beginning, leading to allegations of a double standard regarding other ex-politicians. Still, the Duceppe kerfuffle did shine a spotlight on the increasing number of partisans who participate in the media as political commentators.
Senators need to crack down on themselves and to impose tougher conflict of interest rules, New Democrat MP Charlie Angus