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congestion

Road tolls provide more than just a funding tool to build transit. Road pricing also reduces congestion. It creates incentives to carpool or take transit. Pricing is essential to allocating scarce road resources efficiently and affordably. Instead of being honest with people about the need for funding solutions, however, politicians at Queen's Park have poured cold water on Toronto's plan to pay for transit.
A balanced growth policy that respects and promotes sustainable development along with supplying more affordable shelter for families will help to ensure that the GTA grows while maintaining its competitive advantage in the global marketplace.
Transit agencies are able to operate at a loss during low-demand periods because they operate transit at a profit during peak periods. Regulators allow transit monopolies in exchange for the guaranteed service on low-ridership routes, which for-profit transport providers like UberHop are unlikely to consider.
Here's a fall riddle for you. Which comes first, the blankets and hot tea or the cold that keeps you from enjoying anything but? Cold season is descending upon us as quickly as pumpkin spice-everything season, and at some point you'll come down with one, too.
On June 10, the Toronto City Council will vote on the future of the eastern section of the Gardiner Expressway. Many councillors are still undecided. If the council were to rely on evidence and facts, it would vote for the Hybrid option because it serves the welfare of millions more Torontonians than the Remove (8-lane Boulevard) option.
Toronto's medical officer last week argued that replacing Gardiner East with an 8-lane boulevard (the Remove Option) is preferred over realigning Gardiner East (the Hybrid Option) to connect with the DVP.This is one case where I argue the doctor does not know best.
The GO Transit network has sufficient capacity in the non-peak direction of travel during peak periods, and in both directions during off-peak periods. The government should offer free GO service in off-peak periods and in the non-peak direction during the peak period. The Pan Am Games should bring the City together in a mass celebration of the human spirit. The current plans require people to stay away or at home, which is against the very spirit of the Games. Let's plan better to have fun at the Games.
While the City's traffic department sounds confident in its assertions, its recommended guidelines on lane widths are in stark contradiction to what we know from traffic engineering and safety studies. Narrower lane widths by default have higher accident rates. Even more disconcerting is the City's backgrounder on lane width guidelines, which states that traffic "throughput is independent of speed." Nothing could be more wrong about traffic flow than this statement.
The Yonge-University-Spadina (YUS) subway line carries 34 per cent fewer passengers during rush hour than its design capacity
Public transit alone will not solve our congestion problems or improve the health of our cities. Here then is a selection of transit solutions NOT making headlines in Toronto's municipal elections.
Anyone who has been down to the Harbourfront recently knows that Queens Quay is under construction. The streetcar tracks are being replaced and Waterfront Toronto is building a new tree-lined promenade that will be spectacular once complete, but creates traffic chaos in the meantime. Although I expected the construction on Queens Quay, nothing prepared me for the trifecta of traffic interruptions that followed. Traffic was already heavy because it was the season home opener for the Argos. That would have been fine, if the rest of the transportation network had been working.
Some transit experts argue that commute times by high-speed rail transit are shorter. It is true for individual trips, but not for the entire communities. Commuters in transit-dependent communities, with ready access to subways, can take faster transit to their destinations, however shorter duration trips are enjoyed only by those whose trip lengths are shorter. With $29 billion in transport infrastructure spending already earmarked for Ontario, Steven Del Duca and Kathleen Wynne, will receive tons of unsolicited advice. They should, however, base their investment decisions on sound analysis rather than conjecture.
Over the past four weeks, pundits, parties and candidates in the Ontario race have talked everything from jobs to transit to past scandals and old grievances. There's one issue, though, that they've been silent on: affordable housing. By ignoring housing, all three major parties have abandoned the primary need of the most vulnerable residents in our communities. Instead, Wynne, Hudak and Horwath have focused on jobs, gridlock and rebuilding Ontario's economy without recognizing that affordable housing is a key part of the solution to each of those problems.
For months, John Tory has claimed that his number one priority for transit expansion would be a new subway line to relieve pressure on the overcrowded Yonge line. Then he shook his etch-a-sketch and poof, it's gone. Relieving congestion on the Yonge line moves to the back of the bus. Same thing happened with his positions on the Gardiner and the Eglinton Connects.
Toronto's long commute times have become a constant refrain dominating the public discourse. Many believe that the commute times are excessive. However, if the laws of physics and common sense were to prevail, Toronto's 33-minute one-way commutes make perfect sense.
We reach for the nasal spray when we develop that nasty, congested feel. You know the one; your nose is clogged, you can't
Is everything old new again? Much like how traditional ancient grains are now a “new” healthy staple hordes of people are
We’ve all been there; you wake up and suddenly, your head feels like it’s been packed with foam. Your throat is as tender
When it comes to urban sustainability, cities in the U.S. and Canada are employing innovative programs and policies to improve the health and well-being of residents and their local environments. But (with some notable exceptions, such as Vancouver and Calgary) no successful rapid transit infrastructure projects have been built in Canadian cities for decades.
Ontario has followed the same basic transportation strategy for decades. We build more roads, traffic congestion increases