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Construction

Even in B.C.'s quiet housing market, there is plenty of underlying demand, BMO says.
Just because you can hear or feel the construction does not mean that there is an issue.
As cities across Ontario try to squeeze out savings to expand public transit, something doesn't add up. Too many cities, including Toronto, are missing out on hundreds of millions in savings. That's because Ontario has a labour law loophole that's putting cities, companies and taxpayers at a huge disadvantage.
You have probably bought forest products like lumber for a home reno or notepaper for school supplies and wondered how your purchase affects the forest it came from. You may feel guilty, but you shouldn't if the forest products you buy are harvested sustainably and certified to internationally recognized standards.
My kids want a back yard (and so does my dog), but I don't want to double or triple my mortgage for a piece of grass and a couple extra feet between me and my neighbours. Many have suggested we move farther afield, but I don't want to uproot the family, take my son out of his school and my daughter way from her friends -- that is the dilemma.
The establishment of a net-zero energy ready code target for new buildings by 2032 and the development of an energy "step code" for local governments are positive steps toward a sustainable future for B.C.'s buildings.
How did B.C. end up in the peculiar situation of having to rely on the private sector to oversee private sector construction companies working on public sector infrastructure projects, potentially signing off on billions of tax dollars in cost overruns along the way?
The first time I heard the line "you're not stuck in traffic, you are traffic" I immediately liked it. People tend to ignore their participation and impact on a situation and often believe things are happening to them, not because of them. I wanted to explore this concept as it applies to the Canadian real estate, specifically the Vancouver and Toronto metro area housing markets.
I think I'm reasonably well versed in issues surrounding the Energy East Pipeline, both economic and environmental. But I am struck by how, in any official TransCanada communications about environmental implications of the project, climate change is never mentioned.
Graduation ceremonies are underway at high schools across the province, as students get set to take their skills to the next level. At 84 per cent, B.C.'s high school graduation rate has never been higher. While that's reason to celebrate, we should also be asking why the province's apprenticeship programs aren't achieving anywhere near the same success rates.
Though these are welcome changes to anyone who has endured noisy neighbours, the changes will not result in an immediate noise reduction for all as they are only applicable to new buildings. If you are facing noisy neighbours, there is some relief for existing multi-unit home owners.
Politics aside, the concept behind infrastructure spending in theory makes sense: with interest rates near all-time lows and little expectation of them going up in the short term, now is probably as a good a time as any to borrow money and put it to work.
Greening the building sector is one of the most cost-effective and economically beneficial ways to reduce energy demand and emissions while also supporting climate adaptation and resilience. These solutions exist and can be put into action right now. It's also a solid way to get a moribund economy moving.
Carl Lauren's company Tyee Custom Homes builds about 12 homes a year and about six of those are in Kimberley. Lauren says making homes energy efficient today is important because homes are going to last 50 years or more. The better the home, the more energy saved, and those lower emissions are going to be way into the future.
There are ways of funding badly needed projects that are already at hand and don't involve squeezing the long-suffering taxpayer harder. Although it would take some political will, Toronto could realize millions in savings that would go a long way in addressing its budget shortfall.
If the former chief economist of BMO is right, one of Justin Trudeau’s first challenges as prime minister will be to grapple
The NMC should enhance the musical landscape in Calgary by becoming a focal point for activity, and create a bridge to the music industry across the country. It will be a hub for community events and activities in Calgary's East Village, a key part of that area's redevelopment. It will spur cultural tourism and likely be a catalyst for employment in commercial music and related sectors.
Canada's economy shrank in January, declining by 0.1 per cent following 0.3-per-cent growth in December, StatsCan said Tuesday
BuzzBuzzHome:At the end of Q2-2014, there were 213,683 homes being built across Canada’s 10 busiest new residential construction
I have a serious crush on the TTC. Before we all get our transit passes in a twist I want to remind all of my fellow Torontonians of just a few of the amazing things about the TTC!