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Consumer Confidence

Only in Ontario are people more confident in the economy now than before the vote.
A booming job market, a recovery on the Prairies and optimism about housing are fuelling major positivity.
"The frenzy is over .... Sanity is returning to the marketplace."
Confidence in job security is actually above the long-run average.
There’s nothing like a democratic change of government to make people feel hopeful about the future, and last week’s Canadian
Prime Minister Stephen Harper says Canadian consumers’ high debt loads are a sign of confidence in the economy. But Harper’s
The collapse in oil prices has evidently shaken Canadians’ faith in the economy, and public attitudes are the most sour they
With oil prices falling like a brick and the loonie not far behind, Canadians are turning pessimistic on the future prospects
We expect developing markets to re-emerge. They've gone quiet in the past couple of years, weary of waiting for the world's large economies to get going again. Their recent record has persuaded pundits to throw them into the 'new normal' soup.
Exporters are less upbeat about domestic economic conditions. The balance of opinion for this indicator was the only one to fall, edging back marginally to 13 per cent. Paradoxically, they are more positive about domestic sales, where the balance of opinion rose 9 percentage points to 43 percent of those surveyed.
Growth is up, and it's looking like inflation is hard on its heels. The U.K. is charting this new course; we'd all do well to watch with interest, and to wish them well.
After three-and-a-half years of ho-hum on this front, there is renewed interest in interest rates: where they are going, how fast, and what we need to do to be prepared, if change is indeed in the wind. A lot of the talk is related to another 'up' that scares us: inflation. Talk of rising interest rates is very good news, since it strongly suggests higher confidence in near-future growth.
Five years beyond the economic crisis, we are still looking for that solid year of growth. It has been a long time coming, but there is a growing pile of evidence that suggests 2014 is going to mark a significant positive departure from recent experience. Here are six reasons to believe that things are finally on the up-and-up.
For all the pre-crisis talk about resource scarcity, the rarest commodity since crisis hit is confidence. But now, it's the comeback kid of the global economy: the long hibernation is over, and across a number of heavy-hitting economies, confidence is normalizing.
Leading indicators have gained more prominence in the post-crisis period, if only because the on-again, off-again economy has intensified scrutiny of shifts in momentum.If we are going to be months, or more realistically, years in unwinding extraordinary policy measures, which leading indicators can we rely on to point the way for the economy?
Canada's overall numbers are not as impressive, but they reflect the growth rotation that will see exports and business investment grab the baton from the consumer and housing sectors. Conditions already favour export growth: a weakening loonie, a surge in leading sectors, a key export market that is leading the way, and strong demand for resources.
We're living in an age where everyone with an Internet connection has the ability to become a journalist; to write his or her own critique of a product or service. And if they lack diction or the ability to disseminate their ideas into the digital realm, they can easily connect with someone who can help them articulate, package and market their thoughts.
There's a sour seasonality that has become entrenched in recent global economics. In the past few years, summer has become a disarmingly punctual momentum-killer of global production. Perhaps the most critical question in EDC's Summer 2013 Global Export Forecast is whether we are in for yet another summer drubbing, or whether this is the year we break with that sorry tradition.
Canadians aren't too optimistic about what the country's economic future holds, that is, unless those Canadians live in Alberta
Canadians are rapidly losing confidence in the economy and their own economic prospects, a new report from RBC has found