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cop21

A major element towards success is accountability -- making sure governments and the private sector play their part. Asia Pulp &Paper is advocating "putting a price on nature." This will encourage private sector involvement. Businesses need to be economically invested in the survival and protection of our landscapes.
On Thursday I arrived at the Action COP. That's the name COP 22 in Marrakech, Morocco earned as the meeting to follow the historic passing of the Paris Agreement and its entry into force earlier this month. Here are just a few of the key areas BCCIC is keeping an eye on while in Marrakech to measure progress.
We cannot spend tens of millions of dollars promoting a low carbon future while also spending tens of millions promoting extractives. With the Agreement in full force, Canada can pivot its approach to international assistance to reflect real policy coherence. We need to support small-scale, decentralized clean energy programs that promote pro-poor, gender sensitive projects.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau needs to pull back from his confrontational approach to negotiating a climate change agreement with the provinces. Instead of using the threat of unilaterally ratifying the Paris Agreement as a blunt instrument, the government should come up with a new plan involving proportionality.
As the eyes of the world move away from the medals table in Rio, for those of us in the sustainability business our focus shifts to Honolulu for the World Conservation Congress. Like the Olympics this is a big deal. Meeting once every four years, it is hosted by an affiliate of the UN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
During the fall election, the federal Liberals committed to meet with the provinces within 90 days of COP21 negotiations in Paris to "develop a carbon pricing policy." This highly anticipated First Ministers' Meeting took place last week in Vancouver. Much like the Paris Agreement itself, the Vancouver Declaration may have been the best consensus we could have reasonably hoped for. But also like Paris, it doesn't go nearly far enough.
From Canada's early entry as a climate action leader -- hosting the world's first international scientific climate conference in 1988 -- until today, most governments have played for time. Stalling tactics and procrastination, two steps forward and one step back, have typified climate strategies. For the Trudeau administration, the clock is ticking loudly. Canada has still not replaced the weak target of the previous government. The Liberal platform promised a national plan, based on provincial consultations, within 90 days of the Paris talks, which is March 12.
With oil prices currently in free fall, the need for a national strategy to end our dependency on fossil fuels is as pressing as ever. But with average global temperatures already having risen almost 1°C above preindustrial levels, there is also a pressing need for Canada's leaders to make climate change adaptation a priority domestically and in its support for developing countries.
I know that the term "ethical oil" has some blemishes on it because of issues surrounding its origin, but I believe in the concept behind the term. I want my personal gasoline purchases to go towards subsidizing medicare and not subsidizing a despot or paying for a tyrant to bomb his neighbour.
After 83 days in power for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the House of Commons has resumed sitting. Ottawa will be back in full swing with hundreds of new staffers settling into their new roles. As ministers return to the question period briefed up, staffed up and, ideally, rested up from the holiday, we will see a more comfortable team working to deliver on the government priorities set out in their platform and Speech from the Throne: growing the economy for the middle class, providing Canadians with open and transparent government and fighting climate change.