HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

copyright

The president violated copyright law, claims the company representing the parent, by using a video that Twitter had said was "manipulated" to make a political point.
Pot dispensaries like to play around with familiar brands. See if any of these look familiar to you.
Some 55,000 Canadians may soon be named in a “reverse class action" lawsuit for sharing movies online. For each violation, Voltage Pictures wants to extract up to $5,000 — the maximum amount allowed. Experts warn that the suit is part of a trend of "troll-type activity in Canada now that is driving normal people crazy," according to a report by The Globe and Mail.
The evidence suggests piracy is not hurting Canadian producers the way Bell's coalition would have you believe.
This provides a modern solution to promote the free flow of legal content in Canada, while making it harder for piracy sites to cause harm.
Canada's largest telco wants tougher new copyright laws written into NAFTA.
The company's copyright advocacy goes beyond what even some U.S. rights holders have called for.
They've already raided a Montreal man's home.
The digital era, it was believed, would usher in a utopia for both musicians and the consumer. But in reality, artists - the people who build our nation's cultural foundation and much of the intellectual property we export - now struggle more than ever to earn a living. The creative middle class has virtually ceased to exist.
It's happened an enormous amount recently and it grinds my gears. You may be asking, but isn't imitation the highest form of flattery? No, it's not. It's irritating as all hell.
The prospect of considering expanded blocking for copyright purposes validates the fears of civil liberties groups that the introduction of blocking requirements invariably expands to cover a wider net of content. Canadian copyright was already on track for a boisterous debate in the coming years with changes such as copyright term extension mandated by the Trans Pacific Partnership and a review of the law scheduled for 2017. If government officials envision adding VPN usage, access to U.S. Netflix and website blocking to the list of issues, copyright could emerge as one of the government's most difficult and controversial issues.
Canada has agreed to tough new rules surrounding internet piracy under the recently announced Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP
There is a distinction between two kinds of rights held by copyright owners: economic rights and moral rights. Any Canadian politicians seeking to use a musical work at a public event should be aware of the legal issues that may arise when a work is directly linked with a political party or message.
There's a lot at stake here -- if Canada continues on the path the current government has set it on, then harmful policies on surveillance, Internet censorship, and Big Telecom dominance could be locked in place for a generation, and hold back our digital economy. Canadians deserve better.
No, restaurants don't just sing their own version of 'Happy Birthday' because they feel like it, it's because they have to
The CBC has asked YouTube and Facebook to remove the Conservative Party’s latest attack ad against Liberal Leader Justin
Music, much like all art and cultural productions, thrives because musicians are constantly borrowing, sharing, and reacting. Slap a copyright on a chord progression, melody, riff, or a tone and watch the endless variety, one of the most beloved qualities of music and the 21st Century, wither. That's why we're fighting back against TPP copyright extremism.
The threats of hundred-thousand dollar fines and getting booted off of the Internet came on the heels of a new law requiring ISPs to pass copyright infringement notices on to their subscribers. The ISP are now legally obliged to comply, forwarding the notices along to alleged infringers verbatim and, as it now turns out, without much attention to whether the content owners were even accusing the right person.
Canada has allowed itself to become a “haven” for online piracy, and the country’s inaction on the issue is forcing other
Do we want an Internet that works for everyday citizens -- or one dominated by powerful bureaucracies, be they spy agencies, giant telecom conglomerates, or powerful Hollywood lobbyists? If we want a free and open Internet that works for all of us then we're going to have to fight for it.