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cpso

This month, as Toronto plays host to one of the largest Pride celebrations in the world, it's worth reflecting on the long way Canada's LGBT community appears to have come in terms of advancing their legal rights.
In a blog post last August, I discussed the heated debate that was taking place regarding whether doctors should be allowed
Contrary to the insinuation that the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario is out to protect doctors and keep the public in the dark, they are, in actual fact, out to protect the interests of the public first and foremost. Is the general public, with their lack of medical training and limited knowledge of how the health profession works, really in a position to sift through and understand medical information better than the trained doctors and highly-skilled and trained health professionals who have been appointed to investigate these matters?
Current media reports have highlighted that doctors can legally demand a fee to fill out this form because it is not an insured service. But really, the difference between the medical document and a prescription is clearly one of semantics. By paying hundreds of dollars to have doctors fill out medical documents, we are inadvertently reinforcing the stigma surrounding cannabis for medical purposes -- the idea that there is something "illegitimate" about cannabis' therapeutic potential and the patients who use it.