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Craig Kielburger

“How many times do we have to go through things like this?”
As a former volunteer, I believe a conversation about WE's voluntourism model and youth engagement practices is long overdue.
Throughout history, youth have played prominent roles in spurring social change.
Canadians need to understand that wildlife trafficking isn't confined to faraway jungles.
The WE Pledge isn't just about us. When I take the Pledge, I'm not just making a promise to our organization. I am making a commitment to my family, my community, my country and the world. I am committing to make a difference through my daily actions.
We Day makes the case that Indigenous issues should matter to the youngest Canadians.
"Now, for both girls and boys, instead of going to the bush to take care of animals, we are going to school."
Ask Craig Kielburger how parents can get kids involved in social change and the activist still gets excited — even 20 years
On Thursday October 1st the Air Canada Centre was transformed into a gigantic classroom with over 20,000 students to host
"So often when Canada talks about our aboriginal population, we frame it as problems to be solved."
One day, when anti-child labour activist Iqbal Masih was riding his bike in his hometown, he was shot and killed. Iqbal was 12 when he died. The same age Free the Children's Craig Kielburger was at the time. The same age I am now.
For many developing communities, like those in South Sudan animals are walking bank accounts, dowries and life insurance policies. To lose your livestock is to lose everything. Veterinarians Without Borders (VWB) tackles a problem many don't even realize exists.
The black and white photo is an almost cliché depiction of simpler, happier times. Two young boys, dressed up in Roy Rogers-esque cowboy duds. Ironically, both cowboys are actually Indians.
Since 1989, thousands of Canadian officers have volunteered in the world's most dangerous countries to train police. It's one of Canada's least recognized international development initiatives and, as Terry Gould puts it, "the last vestige of Canada's blue-helmet heritage."
We're winning the fight against HIV/AIDS, but we can't be complacent. There's still work to be done. For instance, more than 21 million people don't have access to the treatments that can lengthen and improve their lives--largely because an estimated 19 million are unaware they have HIV at all.
For the people of Bhopal, the disaster never ended. They still suffer from water contamination, respiratory illnesses, and higher rates of infant mortality and birth defects. They've waged one court fight after another for more compensation. Thirty years ago the world failed to protect Bhopal. We owe it to them, and all developing communities, to enshrine corporate responsibility in national and international law.
One day, one Grade 9 boy was mercilessly teased for wearing a pink shirt -- the next day, encouraged by seniors Price and Shepherd on social media, 800 schoolmates showed up in a sea of pink to express their solidarity. Today, Pink Shirt Days are held in schools across 13 countries by students who want to show they won't tolerate bullying.
From pollution to poverty, social enterprises like the Plastic Bank are discovering new solutions to old problems. And Canadian entrepreneur David Katz shows us the key to successful social enterprises lies in changing the way we think, finding the value in people and things everyone else tosses aside.
In ancient Greek mythology, King Sisyphus was cursed for an eternity to heave a massive boulder up a steep hill, only to watch the rock roll back down again and again when he nears the top. Compared to the struggles of women everywhere for equality and respect, you could say Sisyphus had it soft. At the current rate of progress it will take at least 81 years for women globally to achieve global equality in key areas, according to a new report from the World Economic Forum (WEF). Meanwhile, from the studios of the CBC to the streets of New York, recent stories of harassment and violence against women abound.
Every week, more than a half-million Canadians miss work because of mental health problems, costing the Canadian economy over $50 billion a year. So there's good reason why the Economic Club of Canada teamed up with business leaders and mental health organizations to launch the Wellth Management Mental Health at Work Challenge this fall in cities across the country.